hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 72 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 33 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 20 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Preston Smith or search for Preston Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
been oppressively warm. Dr. Erskine, Major Bulkley, Frank Gowan and Bob Wright called to see me this morning. Spent the afternoon strolling through the woods and fields, meditating, and eating blackberries. June 16th.—Spent the day playing chess with Dr. Erskine. Received a letter from home, written since the Federals have occupied Memphis June 17th.—Hartsfield and I are on guard to-day at General Polk's headquarters. The old 154th was to-day transferred to the brigade of General Preston Smith. June 21st.—Our tents arrived from Okalona, and I will sleep under shelter to-night for the first time in a month. Graybacks have invaded our camp and are hard to repel. Mr. Chrisp was complaining of the invaders when Spivey claimed exemption from the common scourge. It was too much for the old gentleman, and bristling up, he gave Spivey a piece of his mind. Spivey, he said, if there is a soldier in this army who is not troubled with these pestilent campfollowers, there is som<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
l W. L. Sykes and Major J. B. Herring. Eighth Mississippi, Colonel J. C. Wilkinson. Maney's brigade. Brigadier-General George Maney. First and Twenty-seventh Tennessee, Colonel H. R. Feild. Fourth Tennessee (Prov. Army), Colonel J. A. McMurry, Lieutenant- Colonel R. N. Lewis, Major O. A. Bradshaw, and Captain J. Bostick. Sixth and Ninth Tennessee, Colonel George C. Porter. Twenty-fourth Tennessee battalion, (S. S.), Major Frank Maney. Smith's brigade. Brigadier-General Preston Smith-Colonel A. J. Vaughan, Jr. Eleventh Tennessee, Colonel G. W. Gordor. Twelfth and Forty-seventh Tennessee, Colonel W. M. Watkins. Thirteenth and Fifteenth Tennessee, Colonel A. J. Vaughan, Jr., and Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. Pitman. Twenty-ninth Tennessee, Colonel Horace Rice. Dawson's Battalion ( Composed of two companies from the Eleventh Tennessee, two from the Twelfth and Forty-seventh (consolidated), and one from the One Hundredth and Fifty-fourth Senior Tennesse
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. Advance into Kentucky. August 13, 1862.—General Preston Smith's brigade left Knoxville at 5 o'clock this morning. We marched thirteen miles and halted for the night at 2 o'clock P. M. We rested about one hour during the march. The heat was intense and the dust almost suffocating. Harry Cowperthwaite, of the Maynards, was overcome by the intense heat and fainted under the scorching rays of the noonday sun. My knapsack was a heavy burden, but the anticipation oan clothes helped me to endure the extra weight. Many of the boys left their knapsacks at Knoxville and will probably never see them again. The baggage of the officers is limited and my chess-board was left behind in Major Dawson's box. General Preston Smith has ordered brigade guard to-night and I am the unfortunate individual that represents the Maynard Rifles in that grand farce. But the drum beats and the guard must obey. August 14.—Another day of intense suffering. Marched thirteen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dairy of Rev J. G. Law. (search)
e more of it before night. Our army is elated with success and flushed with victory, while the enemy are demoralized and dispirited by continuous defeat. General Preston Smith is now in command of the division, as General Cleburne is disabled by his wound. Colonel Vaughn, of the Thirteenth Tennessee, commands the brigade, and Li accomplished young officer. His death will be deeply lamented. It is a costly victory when two such men as Fitzgerald and Fowlkes yield up their lives. General Preston Smith rode up to our regiment as we were formed in the streets of Richmond, and congratulating us on our victory said: Boys, there is one thing I have to say, thp to-night two miles from Georgetown, and after marching four days, find ourselves only fourteen miles distant from Lexington. We can't understand the circle in which we are moving. General Preston Smith's brigade is alone, and I suppose that our General is taking his boys to see the capitol of the State. Marched eighteen miles.