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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 72 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 33 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 20 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 29, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Preston Smith or search for Preston Smith in all documents.

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y. The number of killed is small compared with the number of wounded, which is unusually large, and the wounds are unusually slight. Many of the wounded of the enemy fell into our hands, and all of his dead, together with about forty pieces of artillery, several thousand small arms, between six and eight thousand prisoners, (some of whom were wounded,) and between twenty-five and thirty stands of colors. Among our own casualties were several general and field officers, including Brig.-Gens. Preston Smith and Deishler killed, Maj.-Gen. Hood badly wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Dan. Adams severely wounded and in the hands of the enemy. Brig.-Gen. Benning received a slight wound, though he still remains in the saddle. Monday was devoted to the care of the wounded, the burial of the dead, and the gathering up of the arms and other trophies of the battle. The enemy withdrew to Missionary Ridge Sunday night, and on Monday night continued his retreat to Chattanooga and the Tennessee river