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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 33 3 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 28 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 15 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 8 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Sydney Smith or search for Sydney Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 8 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
on in mute admiration, and then told some of his capital stories. As a story-teller he is unparalleled, but says little in general conversation. It is only when the ladies have retired, and there is room for something approaching license, that he is at his ease. He then dramatizes and brings before you Sir Charles Wetherell and the Duke of Cumberland, and whom he wishes. In his line he is first; but, as a contributor to the intellectual feast, he is of little value,—vastly inferior to Sydney Smith, whose humor makes your sides shake with laughter for weeks after you have listened to it. We left Follett at about half-past 11 o'clock; and Talfourd carried me to the Garrick, where we found Poole. Talfourd took his two glasses of negus, his grilled bone, and Welsh rare-bit; and both he and Poole entertained me by their reminiscences of Godwin. While I listened late at night to these reminiscences, I did not expect the next evening to be sitting on the same sofa chatting with Godwin
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
er, more interesting than any person I have met. He has not the airy graces and flow of Jeffrey, the piercing humor of Sydney Smith, the dramatic power of Theodore Hook, or the correct tone of Charles Austin; but he has a power, a fulness of informatory and the British Constitution; and author of Inquiry into the Rise and Growth of the Royal Prerogative in England. Sydney Smith introduced him to Lord Holland, who had asked if he could recommend any clever young Scotch medical man to accompany him to Spain.—Sydney Smith's Memoir, by Lady Holland, Chap. II. Lady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian relphus was as quiet as usual,—you know him as the friend of Scott,—and Macaulay was truly oppressive. I now understand Sydney Smith, who called Macaulay a tremendous machine for colloquial oppression. His memory is prodigious, surpassing any thin
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
ed with admiration of it. He asked me, in his name, to present a copy of his forthcoming book to Dr. B.'s family, and to let them know the impression their father's labors had made upon his mind. I was happy in being able to tell him something of Dr. B., of whose life and place of residence he was entirely ignorant. Lord Brougham is not agreeable at dinner. He is, however, more interesting than any person I have met. He has not the airy graces and flow of Jeffrey, the piercing humor of Sydney Smith, the dramatic power of Theodore Hook, or the correct tone of Charles Austin; but he has a power, a fulness of information and physical spirits, which make him more commanding than all! His great character and his predominating voice, with his high social and intellectual qualities, conspire to give him such an influence as to destroy the equilibrium, so to speak, of the table. He is often a usurper, and we are all resolved into listeners, instead of partakers in the conversational banqu
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
se for more than forty years; a contributor to the Edinburgh Review on subjects relating to English, French, and Spanish history and the British Constitution; and author of Inquiry into the Rise and Growth of the Royal Prerogative in England. Sydney Smith introduced him to Lord Holland, who had asked if he could recommend any clever young Scotch medical man to accompany him to Spain.—Sydney Smith's Memoir, by Lady Holland, Chap. II. Lady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Sydney Smith's Memoir, by Lady Holland, Chap. II. Lady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian religion, and on this subject gave a tone to the conversation of Holland House.—Greville's Memoirs, Chap. XXX., Dec. 16, 1835. the friend of Lord Holland. Mr. Hallam, however, thought it was not by him, but by a Spaniard who is in England. I shall undoubtedly be able to let you know by my next letter. Mr. Ford, the writer of the Spanish articles in the Quarterly, has u
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
You have doubtless heard of Webster's reception in England. I have just read a letter from my friend Morpeth Lord Morpeth said, also, in the letter: He (Mr. Webster) talked with great respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating M
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
You have doubtless heard of Webster's reception in England. I have just read a letter from my friend Morpeth Lord Morpeth said, also, in the letter: He (Mr. Webster) talked with great respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating M
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
in London with entertainments. It was pleasant to meet again those dearest to him,—Ingham, Morpeth, and Parkes,—and also to renew his association with Austin, Sydney Smith, Milman, Hayward, Milnes, Inglis, the Grotes, Rogers, and others. He failed to see Lord Brougham, who was at the time absent. On his last day in London, he d many people,—the Lansdownes; Duke and Duchess of Sutherland (the most beautiful woman in the world); Mrs. Norton; Lady Seymour (both very beautiful); Hayward; Sydney Smith; Senior; Fonblanque; Milnes; Milman; the Grotes; Charles Austin (more brilliant than ever); the Wortleys, &c. But I must stop. I must go now to breakfast with Sydney Smith; to-morrow, with Rogers; next day, with dear Sir Robert Inglis; the next with Milnes. But I must be off. Good-by. I shall soon be with you. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To George W. Greene, Rome. London, March 30, 1840. dear Greene,—This is my last salute to you from this side of the Atlan
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
e, I enjoyed in Paris. Still, let me not disparage the latter. It is a pleasure to remember them; but the topics discussed and the tone of the discussion are different. Parkes is absorbed by politics, history, and the real. You and he will have many sympathies. But you would not sympathize with the imaginative, graceful, refined intellect of my friend Milnes,—--perhaps not with the epigrammatic, caustic, highly-finished sculptured mots of Rogers, or the brilliant, argumentative wit of Sydney Smith. I like to find good in every thing; and in all men of cultivated minds and good hearts-thank God I—there is a great deal of good to be found. In some it shows itself in one shape, and in some in another; some will select your favorite themes, while others enjoy ideality and its productions manifold. Let me ask you to cultivate a habit of appreciating others and their gifts more than you do. . . . You think me prejudiced in favor of England. Those who know my opinions know that I s