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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 109 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. S. Smith or search for W. S. Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 2 document sections:

ic property. When we reached this point, we heard a great many rumors from General Smith's cavalry force, in most of which they claimed to have defeated Smith and dSmith and driven him back. General Sherman left his command at Canton, and came on with an escort to this place. The troops moved from there yesterday, and will be here in compelled to apply the torch. It was part of the military programme for General Smith's cavalry expedition, which left Memphis, Tennessee, to operate in conjuncts far north as Louisville and Kosciusko, hoping to gain some information of General Smith's whereabout, but was unable to gather any intelligence of his movements. gunboats building at this point. It was expected that the cavalry force under Smith, which left Memphis about the same time that Sherman's troops left Vicksburgh, tter, I venture to predict that you will have corroborative evidence as soon as Smith's cavalry return to Memphis, in their admitted failure to unite with Sherman, a
ghter, S. E. P. B. Operations of the cavalry under Generals Smith and Grierson. Memphis, Tenn., February 27. Froed to guard our trains, captured property, and negroes, General Smith was greatly outnumbered by the enemy — Forrest's effectft Colliersville, Tennessee, destined to cooperate with General Smith. On the seventeenth we formed a junction at New-Albanytaken, all would be lost. The command was now given by General Smith: Seventh Indiana, charge the enemy! Quick as thought tn the Division of the Mississippi. Under the orders of General Smith, was Brigadier-General Grierson. Prior to setting out,rs of regiments and brigades met at the headquarters of General Smith, where so much of the plan of march as was deemed propeing of the twenty-first, the whole force was ordered by General Smith to return to Okolona, McCrellis's brigade leading, foll somewhat obliquely to the line formed by the brigade. General Smith, who had arrived on the field a short time before, at o