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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 18 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
e Wilderness is commanded to-day by Olmstead; the second, by Mclvorveteran colonels from New York; the third by Colonel Woodall of Delaware. This brigade knows the meaning of that colorless phrase, the casualties of the service, showing the ever shifting elements which enter into what we call identity. Here are all that is left of French's old division at Antietam, and Hays' at Gettysburg, who was killed in the Wilderness, Carroll's Brigade at Spottsylvania, where he was severely wounded; Smyth's at Cold Harbor, killed at Farmville. Into this brigade Owen's, too, is now merged. They are a museum of history. Here passes, led by staunch Spaulding, the sterling 19th Maine, once gallant Heath's, conspicuous everywhere, from the death-strewn flank of Pickett's charge, through all the terrible scenes of Grant's campaign, to its consummation at Appomattox. In its ranks now are the survivors of the old Spartan 4th, out of the Devil's Den, where Longstreet knew them. Heads uncove
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
to starve him into submission. Having considered all the contingencies incident to the bold movement of throwing his army to the south side of the James, he feared no mischief from it, but anticipated much benefit. On the day after the battle, Grant caused slight intrenchments to be thrown up in front of his line, and that night the Confederates made a furious assault on; that front, but were quickly repulsed at every point. On the following day an assault was made on the National left (Smyth's brigade, of Hancock's corps), with the same result. Meanwhile the army, preparatory to its march to the James, was gradually moved toward the left by the withdrawal of corps in that direction; and on the night of the 6th, June 1864. a sharp but unsuccessful assault was made upon the right, then held by Burnside. On the following morning there was a brief armistice, for the purpose of gathering up the dead between the two lines, which had lain there four days; and before night Grant's li
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
ing, and Crawford's in the rear. The Second and Third divisions of the Second Corps (Mott's and Smyth's) were on the Vaughan road, with instructions to fall upon the right of the Confederate works ohe woods, and took position and intrenched on a commanding Hill. The Second division, under General Smyth, had turned off to the right, toward Armstrong's Mill, and very soon found the Confederates in a strong position. Their pickets were driven in after a sharp fight, when Smyth formed a line that connected the left of his division with the right of the Third, commanded by General Mott. Temp Confederates pressed through the tangled swamp, and furiously assaulted the rifle-pits covering Smyth's right. They were repulsed with considerable loss. Twice afterward they attempted to turn his flanks and were repulsed, and at twilight they gave up the attempt. Smyth lost about three hundred men, and his antagonist a few more. during that night the Fifth Corps was brought into connecti
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
and De Trobriand. He soon found himself confronted by Lee's intrenched army. He thought a flanking of the position would be the most effectual way of dislodging his antagonist, but he perceived that it could not be done with his single corps. He therefore resolved to assault, and ordered Barlow up to attack the front, while Miles should assail the Confederate left. The latter did so before Barlow came up, and was repulsed with a loss of about six hundred men. Among the killed were General Smyth and Major Mills. Generals Mott, Madill, and McDougall were severely wounded; so also was Colonel Starbird of the Nineteenth Maine. When Barlow got into position it was too late to attack that night, and the assault was postponed until morning. On the same day Sheridan had dispatched two divisions of cavalry, under Merritt, to Prince Edward Court-House, to oppose the retreat, of Lee on Danville, and a third division, under Crook, was sent to Farmville, where it crossed with difficulty, t
ges to the lead mines of Wythe and the salt-works in Smyth was one of the special objects for which your commanmanded 300 from Wythe, 250 from Washington, 250 from Smyth, 200 from Lee, 100 from Buchanan and McDowell, and 5ing officers had already raised 230 volunteers since Smyth was placed under my command. The enrolled militia of Smyth was 728 Detailed for mining and manufacturing 125   Exempted by the board 114     239  hen I should draft the whole remaining population of Smyth to arrange my command, she contributing her proportion. Only 20 men in Smyth failed to enroll in the militia. The major commanding the militia made return to m about 60 men); and, 10th, Killinger's company, from Smyth. The object of my visit to Lee was to try to rais I found that they required Killinger's company from Smyth and wanted Cornutt's from Grayson to make out the reuty; as, for example, the militia regiment of Wythe, Smyth, Carroll, and Grayson, and that of Washington and Ru
in a strong position, covering both the old and plank roads to Lynchburg, with batteries commanding an open, gentle southward slope of half a mile, over which an assaulting column could only advance at a heavy cost. Humphreys attempted to turn the enemy's flank, but found this impracticable with his single corps; when, sending up Barlow in front, and extending his right, he ordered Miles to attack on this wing; which he did, and was repulsed with a loss of over 600 killed and wounded. Brig.-Gen. Smyth and Maj. Mills were among our killed; Maj.-Gen. Mott, Brig.-Gens. Madill and McDougall, and Col. Starbird, 19th Maine, were severely wounded. When Barlow had got into position, it was too late to assault again that night; and, when darkness had shrouded his movements, Lee silently resumed his retreat, first sending this response to Grant, which reached him at Farmville next morning: April 7, 1865. General — I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the o
r and near. One piece traversed the roof of Mr. Tankersley's house, one square in the rear of Mr. Brown's and Gen. Nichols' residence, on Broadway. It went through the pantry, next to the kitchen, and through the outer plank wall into the yard. We heard of a piece falling at the south side of the public square, penetrating the roof and floor of Mr. J. Dykeman's portico; and an entire bomb at Mr. Blose's foundry, and a piece going to the first ward market, and one shell burying itself near Smyth's garden; but none, fortunately, hitting any one, though some narrow escapes were had. We were shown a 32-pound ball that was said to have been picked up in the street, near Broad-way and Tremont. We have been informed, also, that some of the shells were found unexploded; but we cannot hear that any of the gallant Alden's missiles came nearer than the further part of Mr. League's new hotel lot, on Tremont street, south of the bayou, or about half a mile from the gulf. This is considered by
Dr. Smyth, a prominent scholar of South Carolina, inquires in a pamphlet, What is the difficulty and what the remedy? Not in the election of Republican Presidents. No. Not in the non-execution of the Fugitive Bill. No. But it lies back of all these. It is found in that Atheistic Red Republican doctrine of the Declaration of Independence! Until that is trampled under foot, there can be no peace! --Idem.
bridge: Confederate works at Taylor's bridge on the North Anna, looking from the Confederate works towards the Federal attack. Pontoon bridges below Taylor's bridge on the North Anna. On the pontoon-bridge in the second picture crossed Smyth's division of the Second Corps on the morning of May 24th. Forming in line of battle on the south bank, they advanced and carried the Confederate works that commanded Taylor's or the Chesterfield bridge above. The Confederates at once brought up reenforcements and attacked Smyth, who, also reenforced, held his position during a furious rain-storm until dark. Until the pontoons were laid, Grant could not get his army across the North Anna in sufficient force to make the attack he contemplated. The second picture shows one of the two pontoon-bridges laid below Taylor's bridge so that its defenders could be driven off and the Federal troops enabled to use it. The railroad bridge below Taylor's had been destroyed, but still farther dow
bridge: Confederate works at Taylor's bridge on the North Anna, looking from the Confederate works towards the Federal attack. Pontoon bridges below Taylor's bridge on the North Anna. On the pontoon-bridge in the second picture crossed Smyth's division of the Second Corps on the morning of May 24th. Forming in line of battle on the south bank, they advanced and carried the Confederate works that commanded Taylor's or the Chesterfield bridge above. The Confederates at once brought up reenforcements and attacked Smyth, who, also reenforced, held his position during a furious rain-storm until dark. Until the pontoons were laid, Grant could not get his army across the North Anna in sufficient force to make the attack he contemplated. The second picture shows one of the two pontoon-bridges laid below Taylor's bridge so that its defenders could be driven off and the Federal troops enabled to use it. The railroad bridge below Taylor's had been destroyed, but still farther dow
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