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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 13 1 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
f Caius, to whom Lord Holland gave me letters, and from whom I received a great deal of kindness. I breakfasted with him alone, and enjoyed the variety of his conversation, always nourished with good learning, but never hardened with pedantry. . . . In the afternoon he carried me to dine with a club which originated in attachment to the fallen Stuarts, and was therefore called The Family, but has long since become a mere dinner-party every fortnight. Six of the fourteen Masters were there, Smyth, the Professor of Modern History, and two or three other professors. I was amused with the severity of their adherence to ancient customs and manners, and was somewhat surprised to find pipes introduced after dinner, not so much because smoking was liked, as because it was ancient in the usages of the club. . . . My journey to the North was a journey of speed, and, of course, I saw little and enjoyed less. . . . . Two or three points and moments, however, I shall not easily forget. The
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
hishart * Note by Mr. Ticknor: I did not then know who Whishart was; but Miss Edgeworth afterwards told me that he was a man of much talent, and one of the men of all societies in his time, the particular friend of Sir Samuel Romilly. and Professor Smyth. Professor Smyth, whom Mr. Ticknor had seen in 1819, in Cambridge; see ante, p. 271. I was very glad to go, to meet the latter especially, whom I had barely seen at Lady Lansdowne's concert. His singular appearance attracted my notice thProfessor Smyth, whom Mr. Ticknor had seen in 1819, in Cambridge; see ante, p. 271. I was very glad to go, to meet the latter especially, whom I had barely seen at Lady Lansdowne's concert. His singular appearance attracted my notice there, at first. Tall and somewhat awkward, dressed like a marquis de l'ancien regime, and looking like one, with his earlocks combed out and his hair powdered, but still with an air of great carelessness, he moved about in that brilliant assembly, hardly spoken to by a single person, with a modest and quiet air, as if he belonged not to it; and yet, when there was a fine passage in the music, seeming to enjoy it as if he were all ear. This morning he came in the same whimsical dress, and had th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
nderful machinery of their great woollen manufactory, with a freedom and openness very unusual; and after resting from this labor, he says, I went to dine at Mr. Edward Smyth's, the head of the branch of the Bank of England for Leeds, and brother of Professor Smyth, who is now staying at his house. It was a pleasant, quiet dinnerProfessor Smyth, who is now staying at his house. It was a pleasant, quiet dinner; the professor himself being, as he always is, agreeable, with the utmost simplicity of heart. I saw him constantly in York, and it was one of my pleasures to witness his exquisite enjoyment of the music at the minster. A visit of three days at Thorn's House—the seat of Mr. Gaskell, ten miles from Leeds—now followed. ProfessProfessor Smyth of Cambridge joined the party at Leeds, by appointment, and added to every interest and enjoyment in the next two days by his delightful union of talent, simplicity, quaint humor, and most winning kindliness. Mr. Gaskell had been Member of Parliament for Malden, and his son at this time represented Shropshire. The whole
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
r of the Boston Athenaeum, 8, 12. Shiel, 415. Siddons, Mrs., 55, 56, 66. Sierra Morena, 223. Silliman, Professor B., 14. Simond, M., 153, 179. Simplon, crosses, 160. Sismondi, Mrs., 290. Sismondi, Simonde de, 151, 290, 291, 295, 297, 314. Skene, James, 283. Slavery in the United States, 479. Smidt, Senator, 122, 123. Smith, Benjamin, 175. Smith, Elizabeth, 433. Smith, Professor, Nathan, 14. Smith, Sir, James, 57. Smith, Rev., Sydney, 265, 413, 414, 417, 418, 446. Smyth, Edward, 438. Smyth, Professor W., 271, 272, 415 and note, 438, 439. Sneyd, Miss, Mary, 426, 428. Solmar, Miss, 495. Somerville, Dr., 448. Somerville, Mrs., 411, 412, 448, 479. Sommariva, Marchese, 175. Sonntag, M., 460. Southey, Edith and Isabella, 285. Southey, Mrs. R., 286 and note, 434. Southey, Robert, 50, 135, 136, 285-287, 434. Souza, Mad. de, 248. Souza, M de, 252, 267. Spain, government of, 191; Inquisition, 193, visit in, 185-241. Spanish bull-fights, 202-204;