hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 9 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 6 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for James Russell Soley or search for James Russell Soley in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 6 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Early operations in the Gulf. (search)
Early operations in the Gulf. Professor J. R. Soley, U. S. N. After the seizure of the Pensacola Navy Yard and the movements connected with the relief of Fort Pickens (Vol. I., p. 32), the Gulf Coast remained comparatively quiet until the establishment of the blockade. Hitherto the vessels in this quarter had formed a part of the Home Squadron, under Flag-Officer Pendergrast; but on June 8th, 1861, Flag-Officer William Mervine assumed command of the station, his vessels constituting the Gulf Blockading Squadron. Already the blockade had been set on foot by the Powhatan, at Mobile, and by the Brooklyn, at New Orleans; and soon after Mervine arrived in the steamer Mississippi, he had twenty vessels in his fleet. On July 2d, Galveston, the third port of importance in the Gulf, was blockaded by the South Carolina. The first collision occurred in August, when one of the tenders of the South Carolina, blockading Galveston, was fired on by a battery on the shore. Commander Alde
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
leans was only garrisoned by about 3000 ninety-day troops. The strength of the garrisons of the two forts is stated by Col. Higgins, in his testimony before the Court of Inquiry, as 1100 men. The loss at Forts Jackson and St. Philip was 11 killed and 39 wounded; and at the upper batteries 1 killed and 1 wounded. At Fort Jackson 121 officers and men were surrendered; number at other points not fully reported. Relative strength of the opposing forces. in a letter to the Editors, Professor J. R. Soley, U. S. N. says: In discussing the question of the relative force of the two sides (see p. 33), it should be borne in mind that of the Confederate total of 166 guns, 117 were 32-pounders or smaller; while out of the Union total of 302 guns, only 114 were 32-pounders and smaller. In other words, 70 per cent. of the Confederate batteries were 32-pounders or below, while only 37 per cent. of the Union batteries were 32-pounders or below. This difference in the caliber of the gun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The ram Manassas at the passage of the New Orleans forts. (search)
t time the Manassas was getting between the forts, and I told Captain Levin, the pilot, that we could do nothing with the vessels which had passed, but we could go down to the mortar-fleet; but no sooner had we got in seeing range than both forts opened on us, Fort Jackson striking the vessel several times on the bend with the lighter guns. I knew the vessel must be sunk if once under the 10-inch guns, so I turned up the river again, and very soon saw a large ship, the Hartford Professor J. Russell Soley, U. S. N., in a communication to the Editors, gives the following discussion of the question, Did the Manassas ram the Hartford at the battle of New Orleans? In the affirmative is the following testimony: (1) Captain Kautz, a lieutenant on board the Hartford, says that immediately after the Hartford went ashore she was struck by the fire-raft which was pushed up by the tug Mosher, and immediately after that event the Manassas struck her and turned her round so that she slid off the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Captain Wilkes's seizure of Mason and Slidell. (search)
antic. On the night of the 23d of November, she ran out of the port of St. Pierre, Island of Martinique, eluding the Iroquois (Captain Palmer), which had been sent to search for her. At Gibraltar, having been effectually blockaded by the Tuscarora, she was sold, afterward becoming a blockade runner. Among the vessels sent in search of her were the Niagara, Powhatan, Keystone State, Richmond, and San Jacinto. In his volume, The blockade and the Cruisers (Charles Scribner's Sons), Professor J. R. Soley sums up her career thus: During her cruise she had made 17 prizes, of which 2 were ransomed, 7 were released in Cuban ports by order of the Captain-General, and 2 were recaptured. Apart from the delays caused by interrupted voyages, the total injury inflicted by the Sumter upon American commerce consisted in the burning of six vessels with their cargoes. Editors. Captain Wilkes immediately determined to search for the enemy. At Cienfuegos, on the south coast of Cuba, he lea
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Early operations on the Potomac River. (search)
Early operations on the Potomac River. Professor J. Russell Soley, U. S. N. The first active naval operations of the war were those on the Potomac River, in May and June, 1861. At this time the larger vessels of the navy were engaged in setting on foot the blockade of the coast, in pursuance of the President's proclamations of April 19th and 27th. The Niagara, Minnesota, Roanoke, and Susquehanna on the Atlantic coast, under Flag-Officer Silas H. Stringham, and the Colorado, Mississippi, Powhatan, and Brooklyn in the Gulf, under Flag-Officer William Mervine, took the initial steps to render the blockade effective. Smaller vessels were sent to the blockading stations as rapidly as they could be prepared. The Potomac River, although officially within the limits of the Atlantic Squadron, became early in the war a nearly independent command, owing to its distance from the flag-ship, and its nearness to Washington. In May the Potomac flotilla was organized, under Commander James
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The navy in the Peninsular campaign. (search)
The navy in the Peninsular campaign. by Professor James Russell Soley, U. S. N. On the gun-deck of the Confederate iron-clad, Merrimac. At the opening of the Peninsular campaign, April 1st, 1862, the North Atlantic Squadron, with its headquarters at Hampton Roads, was commanded by Flag-Officer Louis M. Goldsborough. The command included not only the operations in the Chesapeake and its tributary waters, but an entirely distinct series of operations in the sounds of North Carolina, and a third distinct and also very important service,--that of the Wilmington blockade. This concentration of command at a distance from the various fields of action was not without injurious results. The attention of the flag-officer could not be successfully directed at the same instant of time to such varied and complicated movements as were simultaneously in progress in the York River, the James River, Hampton Roads, Albemarle Sound, and the entrance to Wilmington. Of the various plans for