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ge, they were met by Col. Siegel, with 1,500 Union men, who immediately gave them battle. The State troops were posted on a ridge in a prairie with five pieces of artillery, one twelve-pounder in the centre, two six-pounders on the right and left, cavalry on each flank, and infantry in the rear. The artillery of Colonel Siegel approached within eight hundred yards, with four cannon in the centre, a body of infantry and a six-pounder under Lieutenant-Colonel Hassendare on the left, Colonel Solomon's command with a six-pounder on the right, and a body of infantry behind the centre artillery. Colonel Siegel's left opened fire with shrap-nells, and soon the engagement became general. The rebels had no grape, and their artillerists being poor, their balls flew over the heads of the National forces. After two hours firing, the enemy's artillery was entirely silenced, and their ranks broken. The State troops were now driven back some distance, and the officers ordered a retreat
it as an imitation of the vile and unmitigated iron despotism which Russia once maintained over Poland, and Austria over Hungary. But, happily for the South, the issue is not now one of legislation, but of the sword — not one of the ballot, but of the bayonet. The more violent and ultra the measures introduced into the Lincoln Congress, the deeper the gulf between the Northern and Southern people for all future time. The Ninth German regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Solomon, who so greatly distinguished himself under General Sigel at Springfield, Mo., left Milwaukee to-day for Fort Leavenworth, well armed and equipped. A proclamation was issued to-day at Hatteras, N. C., by Marble Nash Taylor, loyal Provisional Governor of North-Carolina, congratulating the people of his State upon their deliverance from rebel thraldom by the invincible arms of the Republic. He calls upon all well-disposed persons to cooperate with this friendly army in restoring to
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
lies, marched more than three hundred miles over the worst roads possible, with an active enemy harassing them at every step. Their difficulties, indeed, were far too numerous to mention in this short sketch. Whenever Steele was attacked, he defeated the enemy; and the only mistake he appears to have made was in sending back an empty wagon-train to be captured instead of retaining it with the army. General Steele was a soldier who knew his business, and he was supported by Generals Rice, Solomon, Carr, and Thayer, who inspired their men with their own martial spirit. They outwitted the Confederates as well as outfought them on every occasion; and we only regret that the dispatches sent off by General Banks in a gun-boat did not reach General Steele in time to save the large wagon-train captured by the enemy. But to return to affairs on Red River. When it was found that Banks would probably retreat to Alexandria, the Admiral got the Eastport and other large vessels over the bar
of march, and while we are writing is marching through the city with the guns and trophies captured from the enemy. Such is an outline of the expedition as we have gathered it from those who accompanied it. Our losses in the various skirmishes were light, being only in wounded and those taken with the train. The report of the loss on Saturday has not been received, but it was small, and that of the enemy heavy, as the latter attacked while our men fought from position. Generals Rice, Solomon, Carr, and Thayer, all fought like bull-dogs, and, when their commands were attacked, successfully repulsed the enemy. The negro regiments fought well, and took two guns at Elkins's Ferry. It is evident that the check received by General Banks, and his falling back to Grand Ecore, made a further advance by General Steele, with his small army, impossible. It was useless to hold Camden and depend upon supplies from this point or Pine Bluff. As the Red River expedition had been delayed,
servant, James G. Blunt, Brig.-General Commanding First Division Army of Frontier. Chicago evening Journal account. Cane Hill, (or Booneville,) Arkansas, headquarters army of the frontier, First division, December 1, 1862. Again we have put the enemy to flight. I will briefly give you the particulars of the battle of Cane Hill, or Boonsboro. Gen. Blunt's division of the army, consisting of three brigades, four batteries, and six mountain howitzers, under the command of General Solomon, First brigade, Col. Ware, Second brigade, Col. Cloud, Third brigade, were in camp near Lindsey's Prairie on the evening of the twenty-sixth. Orders were issued for detachments from each regiment to move at daylight on the morning of the twenty-seventh, with three days rations of hard bread and salt in their haversacks. Most of the artillery was ordered to move, and all the ambulances accompanied the column. Promptly at daylight the column was put in motion, General Blunt commandin
Virginia State Convention.thirty-fourth day. Monday, March 25, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Solomon, of the Disciples Church. Personal Explanations. Mr. Hall, of Marion, rose to a privileged question, and proceeded to correct some portion of his remarks on Friday and Saturday, as reported in the official organ of the Convention, the Richmond Enquirer. Mr. Boisseau, of Dinwiddie, made a similar correction of his remarks on Saturday. Equality of taxation. The President announced the pending question, namely; the resolutions on the subject of taxation and representation, offered by the gentleman from Monongalia, (Mr. Willey.) Mr. Turnek, of Jackson, being entitled to the floor, addressed the Convention. He desired the withdrawal of the resolutions, and advocated the adoption of a series offered by himself, early in the session. He maintained that they covered the whole subject wherein the people of hi
Virginia State Convention.thirty-fourth day. Monday,March 25, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Solomon, of the Disciples Church. personal Explanations. Mr. Hall, of Marion, rose to a privileged question, and proceeded to correct some portion of his remarks on Friday and Saturday, as reported in the official organ of the Convention, the Richmond Enquirer Mr. Boisseac, of Dinwiddle, made a similar correction of his remarks on Saturday. Equality of taxation. The President announced the pending question, namely the resolutions on the subject of taxation and representation, offered by the gentleman from Monongahela, (Mr. Willey,) Mr. Turnek, of Jackson, being entitled to the floor, addressed the Convention. He desired the withdrawal of the resolutions, and advocated the adoption of a series offered by himself, early in the session. He maintained that they covered the whole subject wherein the people of h
e wounded, and one missing. Dr. Quarles, of St. Louis, is one of the Confederates killed. St. Louis, June 20.--Two field- places and a number of muskets were captured by the Iowa Federal troops at Hanson, on the Hannibal Railroad, on Wednesday. Twenty-three Secessionists were also captured at Cameron, and several wagon loads of lead, a quantity of power and eight cannon. Seventy head of cattle were captured by the Federal troops at Rolla, and twenty five prisoners were also taken. Col. Solomon's Regiment left Rolla on the 17th for Springfield. Col. Seigel's Regiment will soon follow. Skirmish between the Missourians and Kansas soldiers. St. Louis, June 19.--Advices from Kansas City, Via St. Joseph, give the following account of the engagement near Independence on Thursday last, briefly alluded to yesterday: A detachment or Federal troops, under Capt. Stanley, with a flag of truce, visited the camp of the State troops to ascertain the purposes of Capt. Holloway. Durin
The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1860., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. (search)
olitical gathering here to discuss the political condition of the country. The excitement in regard to the election is now painfully intense. There seems to be a large class here who are not a whit behind the fire-eaters of South Carolina. For five days the Baptist State Convention has been in session here, and we have had much able preaching and speaking. Rev. Jas. McDaniel was elected Moderator, and Rev. W. T. Brooks, Clerk. The latter office has for many years been filled by Rev. Mr. Solomon, who has just left to take a church in your city. Rev. L. W. Allen, of Nashville, Tennessee, spoke in behalf of the Bible Board of the S. B. Convention. Rev. B. F. Marable, Corresponding Secretary of the North Carolina State Convention, spoke in favor of the colportage and missionary operations of this State. There are ten colporteurs and twenty missionaries in the employ of the Board. Rev. A. E. Dickinson represented the Foreign Mission Board of the S. B. Convention. --Rev. J. S. W
ith 300 troops from Jefferson City and nine wounded men from Booneville--one died on the way down. Col. Blair arrived on the Swan, and will proceed to Washington to-morrow. He states that the number of State troops killed at Booneville was not less than forty, and he thinks there were many more. About five thousand United States troops are now concentrated at Booneville. From the Southwest we learn that Colonel Siegier's regiment was within three days march of Springfield, and Col. Solomon's one day behind. The latest heard from Governor Jackson was that he was joined at Warsaw by the State troops that attacked Captain Cook's company at Cole, and pushed rapidly south ward. A letter from Southeast Missouri says that Gen. Walker is organizing State troops in nearly all the counties in that portion of the State, to co-operate with the Arkansas forces new at Pocahontas, Arkansas. Troops were flocking rapidly to the State standard. Gen. Baines had arrived in adva
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