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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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children of his country, and with these sailed for the fair land he had found. The expedition was never heard of afterwards. Travellers in the Mississippi Valley and westward of it assert that the Mandans and other Indians who are nearly white have many Welsh words in their language. Allusions to this fact have been made by early and late writers, and it is suggested that the word Mandan is a corruption of Madawgwys, the name applied to the followers of Madawe or Madoc. The traditions of the southern Indians, even as far south as Peru, that the elements of civilization were introduced among them by a white person, who came from the north, favor the theory that the light-colored Indians of our continent have a mixture of Welsh blood, as they have of Welsh language. Until the translation of the Icelandic chronicles, the Welsh historians claimed for their countrymen the honor of being the discoverers and first European settlers of America. Southey made Madoc the subject of a poem.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Westminster Abbey. (search)
ege and theft. It has been sometimes supposed that this was done in old days by mischievous Westminster boys, with no loftier object than to find something conveniently round with which to play hockey in the cloisters. Charles Lamb, writing to Southey, said that perhaps it was the mischief of some school-boy fired with some raw notions of transatlantic freedom. The mischief was done about the time that you were a scholar there. Do you know anything about the unfortunate relic? The passage was a mere jest, but Southey so much disliked any allusion to the Pantisocracy dreams of his earlier days that he remained seriously offended with Lamb for years. I do not believe myself that Westminster boys could ever have been such Philistines as to deface the beautiful works of art which are consecrated by the memories of the dead. The beauty and historic interest of the heads must have tempted the senseless and unscrupulous greed of mere relic-mongers. Over Andreas tomb, fastened to t
f bells, whistles, and trumpets. As to operation, they are sounded by the current, by the ebbing and flowing tide, by the swaying of the waves, by the wind, by bellows, by clock-work impelled by weight or spring. As to construction, they are adapted for headlands, light-ships, buoys, or to be anchored by piles on spits, sand-bars, or shoals. A somewhat notable signal of this kind was the bell on the Inchcape Rock, which was placed there by the good old abbot of Aberbrothock, as sung by Southey in his ballad of Ralph the Rover. The bell or its clapper was swung by the motion of the waves, and was anchored to the dangerous submerged rock, in the track of navigation in the Frith of Forth. A substantial lighthouse now stands on the rock, which is named from the bell formerly placed on the spot by the courageous, pious monks. In A the apparatus is erected on the deck of a ship which is moored in the position required. From posts on the hull is suspended a pendulous frame which i
to a level surface, eight other courses are solid, and from this point the structure is made hollow. The hight of the tower and lantern is 85 feet 7 inches. It was built in 421 working-days, being finished October 16, 1757. The light was originally a chandelier with twentyfour candles. It is now a catoptric light, — an Argand lamp and parabolic reflectors. The change was made in 1807. The Bell Rock lighthouse (c), on the rock once called the Inch-Cape and celebrated in a ditty by Southey, was erected 1807 – 10. The rock is off the Frith of Forth, and is 230 × 427 feet, eleven miles from land. The surface is bare at low water. The lighthouse is built in the manner of the Eddystone, the stones being joggled together, and the layers doweled together by tree-nails. Holes were bored in a circle of 36 feet diameter, and pieces of timber 50 feet in length inserted to support a temporary shelter for 30 workmen during the summer months. The structure is 42 feet diameter at the
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Appendix: Brook Farm — an address delivered at the University of Michigan on Thursday, January 21, 1895: (search)
ssed the fine library that he had previous to our experiment; it was sold to pay off the creditors. We were all proud of the fact, though he never spoke of it. And in a general way our experience was duplicated by the other associations or phalanxes. Without our special misfortune they all came to a similar end. I don't know of one of them that lasted till 1860. That is the story of the socialist movement of that day, and it certainly went far beyond the dreams with which Coleridge and Southey and their friends are said to have entertained their youth a hundred years before. We may say that, as a reform of society, the movement accomplished nothing. But what it did accomplish was a great deal of good for those who were concerned in it and no great loss for any of those who furnished money. Still the questions remain: Is the theory sound? Is that sort of social reform practicable? Fourier said it was, and that in the revolutions of time it would be brought about by natural ca
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
Tribune was started when, in the words of John Morley, a great wave of humanity, of benevolence, of desire for improvement — a great wave of social sentiment, in short-poured itself among all who had the faculty of large and disinterested thinking ; a day when Pusey and Thomas Arnold, Carlyle and Dickens, Cobden and O'Connell, were arousing new interest in old subjects; when the communistic experiments in Brazil and Owen's project at Hopedale inspired expectation of social improvement; when Southey and Coleridge meditated a migration to the shores of America to assist in the foundation of an ideal society, and when philosophers on the continent of Europe were believing that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans for reform — a tendency inherited, perhaps, from his New England place of birth, that land in which every ism of social or religious life has had its origin. The hard experience of his own family, as he shared it in
, Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ities in his character have enabled him not only to save the country from ruin, but also to inspire and sustain a most healthy state of the body politic, in the midst of the avalanches and whirlwinds which have struck and shaken our whole system of civic life. His first characteristic is self-control. He very seldom loses his equanimity. This gives room for the constant exercise of his judgment. His second characteristic is his good, plaint, home-made common-sense. This is a quality, Southey said, rarer than genius. So far as all the real business of life is concerned for men or nations, strong common-sense is the surest and safest guide. Through this alembic all the unfriendly and dangerous elements of this terrible conflict have had to pass. Another quality has mingled itself, by the laws of affinity in moral chemistry, with Mr. Lincoln's executive acts,— humor, bonhommie, good nature. Men have complained of him on this ground. They have charged him with levity. But the
ities in his character have enabled him not only to save the country from ruin, but also to inspire and sustain a most healthy state of the body politic, in the midst of the avalanches and whirlwinds which have struck and shaken our whole system of civic life. His first characteristic is self-control. He very seldom loses his equanimity. This gives room for the constant exercise of his judgment. His second characteristic is his good, plaint, home-made common-sense. This is a quality, Southey said, rarer than genius. So far as all the real business of life is concerned for men or nations, strong common-sense is the surest and safest guide. Through this alembic all the unfriendly and dangerous elements of this terrible conflict have had to pass. Another quality has mingled itself, by the laws of affinity in moral chemistry, with Mr. Lincoln's executive acts,— humor, bonhommie, good nature. Men have complained of him on this ground. They have charged him with levity. But the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
s a dismal chorus from the great British periodicals. As early as 1814 The Quarterly review was chiming in, to be duly followed by the Edinburgh and the British, and by Blackwood's magazine. Both Gifford and Sydney Smith lent their voices, and Southey was supposed by the Americans to have produced one of the bitterest attacks upon them. Various causes exasperated the discussion-discontented emigrants, discontent in England at the emigration, vainglory in America, especially over the outcome aises Cartwright, Heame, and Bartram; the impression which Bartram had left on his mind, says his grandson, was deep and lasting. Lamb is enamoured of pious John Woolman, and eventually favours Crevecoeur, yielding to Hazlitt's recommendation. Southey commends Dwight, and employs Bartram in Madoc. In Mazeppa, Byron, an inveterate reader of travels, takes the notion of an audible aurora borealis from Heame. But the most striking instance is Wordsworth. Commonly supposed to have refrained fro
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
ssured occupation or prospects. He had already come into friendly relations with a number of the leading authors of the day, a group which included Scott, Moore, Southey, and Jeffrey. Scott had in fact sought him out very promptly, having years earlier been fascinated by the originality and the humour shown in The history of New-ount of the Companions of Columbus (1831). The Columbus was published in London and in Philadelphia in 1828 and secured at once cordial and general appreciation. Southey wrote from London: This work places Irving in the front rank of modern biographers ; and Edward Everett said that through the Columbus, Irving is securing the posould have absorbed so thoroughly the spirit of the best that there was in English life. It was in part because men honoured in Great Britain, writers like Scott, Southey, Rogers, Roscoe, Moore, men of affairs like Richard Bentley, John Murray, and many others, came not only to respect, but to have affectionate regard for, the Amer
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