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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Joseph Southwick or search for Joseph Southwick in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ned Lib. 11.119 III. from Hayti. They had embarked for the island on Dec. 28, 1840 (Lib. 11: 3), for the sake of Mr. Henry G. Chapman's health, which was only temporarily benefited. Great was the rejoicing over this reunion, which was signalized by a formal reception. In the evening there was a collation given by the colored people. Garrison, wrote Wendell Phillips to Elizabeth Pease (Ms. Aug. 26, 1841), was in fine vein-witty and fluent; his wife's eyes worth a queen's dowry. Miss Southwick and I were tied to a Haytian to speak bad French to him, as he could talk only [to] two beside ourselves. Bradburn and W. L. G. brightened each other by their retorts. Said Himes, alluding modestly to his wish to be always acting, though only effecting a little, I am but a cipher, but I keep always on the slate. Yes, said W. L. G., and always on the right side. [S. J.] May, whose extra care to be candid led some new-organized ones to fancy he was going to join them, took occasion
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
America, New York, 1887, p. 91). This paper, together with Mr. Phillips's resolutions, Lib. 14.79, [82], 87. was adopted by the Society by a large majority, after vigorous opposition from all quarters—Ellis Gray Loring, David Lee Child, Joseph Southwick, Abner Sanger, William A. White, Of Watertown, Mass., a graduate of Harvard College in 1838, an ardent abolitionist, and most zealous and generous promoter of the temperance, as lecturer and journalist (Lib. 27: 92). etc., from the causes equally so. It puts the Slaveholder in his true place as the Disunionist; it exposes to the world that the only actual disturbing element in our Union is our injustice to our colored brethren. They have Protest of D. L. Child, E. G. Loring, J. Southwick, J. S. Gibbons, etc. made a covenant with death —that covenant they can abrogate. With hell they are at agreement —from it they can withdraw their countenance. The proposition may be, and really is, impracticable to those who feel unwilling <