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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 54 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge. You can also browse the collection for Jared Sparks or search for Jared Sparks in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
e the reader by their good sense and judgment. Levi Hedge, about the same time (18 10), became Professor of Logic and Metaphysics, and he furnished what was for many years the standard American textbook on the former subject. A few years more brought to Cambridge (between 1811 and 1822) a group of men at that time unequalled in this country as regarded general cultivation and the literary spirit,--Andrews Norton, Edward Everett, Joseph Green Cogswell, George Ticknor, Washington Allston, Jared Sparks, Edward T. Channing, Richard H. Dana, and George Bancroft. Most of them were connected with the University, the rest were resident in Cambridge, but all had their distinct influence on the atmosphere in which the Cambridge authors grew. Professor Edward T. Channing especially-grand-uncle of the present Professor of similar name — probably trained as many conspicuous authors as all other American instructors put together. It has also an important bearing on the present volume when we
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 2: old Cambridge in three literary epochs (search)
the distractions of the Revolutionary War, and as forming an epoch in the intellectual history of the United States. This epoch may, however, be better indicated by the foundation of the North American Review, which immediately followed. This periodical, during far the larger part of its early career, was under the editorship of Cambridge men. After the first editor, William Tudor, there came a long line of Cambridge successors — Willard Phillips, Edward Tyrrel Channing, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Francis Bowen, and, after some interval, James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton. The list of chief contributors to the first forty volumes of the Review, as appears from the Index published in 1878, would include, in addition to those already given, C. C. Felton, George Bancroft, H. W. Longfellow, and the elder Norton —— all Harvard instructors. Its connection with Cambridge was therefore well defined and unquestionable. Judge Story, then head of the Harv<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 4: Longfellow (search)
nd the delicate health of his wife made their home less of a resort for others. Longfellow's diaries, so admirably edited by his brother, offer a constant record of visitors more or less transient. This was especially true after his second marriage; before this in 1838 he writes that he dines at five or six, generally in Boston. He then continues, In the evening I walk on the Common with Hillard, or alone; then go back to Cambridge on foot. If not very late, I sit an hour with Felton or Sparks. For nearly two years I have not studied at night, save now and then. Most of the time am alone; smoke a good deal; wear a broad-brimmed black hat, black frockcoat, a black cane. Molest no one. Dine out frequently. In winter go much into Boston society. This mention of the broad-brimmed black hat-now incredible — suggests the criticisms, still remembered in Cambridge, which were made upon Mr. Longfellow's youthful taste for becoming costume. He was undoubtedly thinking of himself wh
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
G., 132. Rousseau, J. J., 191. Ruggles, Mrs., 151. Ruggles, Capt., George, 150. Russell, Miss P., 75. Sackville, Lord, 195. Sales, Francis, 17, 23. Sanborn, F. B., 156, 174, 177. Scott, Sir, Walter, 26, 35, 177. Scott, Sir, William, 45. Scudder, H. E., 69, 70. Sewall, Samuel, 12. Sewell, Jonathan, 12. Seward, W. H., 178. Shaler, Prof. N. S., 70. Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 3, 5, 7. Sidney, Sir, Philip, 159. Smalley, G. A., 192. Smith, Sydney, 105. Smollett, Tobias, 95. Sparks, Pres., Jared, 14, 44, 128. Spenser, Edmund, 47, 154. Storer, Dr. D. H., 113. Story, Judge, Joseph, 16, 44. Story, W. W., 16, 26, 70, 154, 155. Stowe, Rev. C. E., 90, 113. Stowe, Mrs. H. B., 65, 66, go. Sumner, Charles, 104, 123, 132, 191. Swift, Dean, 95, 166. Swinburne, A. C., 132. Tennyson, Lord, 132, 195. Thaxter, Celia, 179. Thaxter, L. L., 174. Thayer, Nathaniel, 106. Thoreau, H. D., 34, 58, 67, 191. Ticknor, Prof., George, 14, 27, 117, 121, 122, 191. Tracy, John, 78. Trowb