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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 54 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Jared Sparks or search for Jared Sparks in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
it was well known that Washington had told Hamilton that he could not receive Talleyrand at his levees, and Pichon had told me, in 1817, that he knew Talleyrand had never forgiven it. Among the Writings of Washington, published in 1838, by Jared Sparks, appears (Vol. X. p. 411) a letter to Alexander Hamilton, dated May 6, 1794, and marked Private, in which the President gives his reasons for not receiving M. Talleyrand-Perigord; and in an accompanying foot-note a letter is given from Lord Lansdowne, introducing Talleyrand to General Washington. The autograph letter of Washington to Hamilton came into Mr. Ticknor's possession through Mr. Sparks. But this naturally brought Hamilton into his thoughts, and of him he spoke willingly, freely, and with great admiration. In the course of his remarks, he said that he had known, during his life, many of the more marked men of his time, but that he had never, on the whole, known one equal to Hamilton. I was much surprised, as well as grat