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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 8 0 Browse Search
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ow it is doubtful whether it would not be more painful than pleasant; but that if it be his lot to go now he will soon have a joyous meeting with the many loved ones gone before, and where the rest of us, through the help of God, hope ere long to join them. Ms. letter to John Johnston, Jan. 12, 1851. Nancy Hanks, the mother of the President, at a very early age was taken from her mother Lucyafterwards married to Henry Sparrow — and sent to live with her aunt and uncle, Thomas and Betsy Sparrow. Under this same roof the irrepressible and cheerful waif, Dennis Hanks Dennis Hanks, still living at the age of ninety years in Illinois, was the son of another Nancy Hanks — the aunt of the President's mother. I have his written statement that he came into the world through nature's back-door. He never stated, if he knew it, who his father was.--whose name will be frequently seen in these pages — also found a shelter. At the time of her marriage to Thomas Lincoln, Nancy was in h<
d exploits with John Duncan and Austin Gollaher. dissatisfaction of Thomas Lincoln with Kentucky. the removal to Indiana. the half-faced camp. Thomas and Betsy Sparrow follow. how Thomas Lincoln and the Sparrows farmed. life in the Lincoln cabin. Abe and David Turnham go to mill. appearance of the milk sick in the Pigeon windows. In this forbidding hovel these doughty emigrants braved the exposure of the varying seasons for an entire year. At the end of that time Thomas and Betsy Sparrow followed, bringing with them Dennis Hanks; and to them Thomas Lincoln surrendered the half-faced camp, while he moved into a more pretentious structure — a cablosing his own life, was enough, he declared, to ruin him, and prompted him to leave for points further west. Early in October of the year 1818, Thomas and Betsy Sparrow fell ill of the disease and died within a few days of each other. Thomas Lincoln performed the services of undertaker. With his whipsaw he cut out the lumber