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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
deceased horses buried. The weather here is perfect — could not be finer. Headquarters, Army of Potomac October 1, 1863 Yesterday we had a sword presentation (nothing else to do now, you know). It would appear that General Warren is a native of Cold Spring, near West Point; whereupon it did occur to the natives of his mother town to buy a sword for him in token of their, etc., etc., etc. The weapon was duly entrusted to the safe keeping of a certain Dr. Young, and of another certain Mr. Spaulding, both of whom arrived, a day or two since, with the precious casket. Early in the morning came an orderly with a notice, saying that the Staff officers were respectfully invited to, etc., etc., etc. We persuaded the Quartermaster to give us a car (which turned out to be a grain car with a few chairs), and, by this means, we were enabled to go from Culpeper in about twenty minutes, the General leading the crowd. General Warren was lodged in Spartan simplicity, in a third-rate farmhouse.
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
er five miles of new railroad, including a number of bridges! This upset him wholly, and it was hard to make him believe that there hadn't been an old line there before. Now where do you suppose I went last night? Why, to the theatre! Certainly, in my private carriage to the theatre; that is to say, on horseback, for may high powers forfend me from an ambulance over corduroys and these mud-holes! Rather would I die a rather swifter death. To explain, you must understand that good Colonel Spaulding commands a regiment of engineers, a fine command of some 1800 men. As they are nearly all mechanics, they are very handy at building and have erected, among other things, a large building, which is a church on Sundays, and a theatre on secular occasions. Thither the goodly Flint rode with me. On the outside was about half the regiment, each man armed with a three-legged stool, and all waiting to march into the theatre. We found the edifice quite a rustic gem. Everything, except the n
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
r, 229. Slocum, Henry Warner, 22. Smith, William Farrar, 136, 137, 143, 160; described, 140; lunch, 148; before Petersburg, 161, 164n; Butler and, 192. Smyth, Henry Augustus, 275. Snyder, —, 72. Soldier, qualities of a great, 163. Spaulding, Ira, 311. Spaulding, —, 26. Spies, Rebel, 244. Spotsylvania, operations near, 104. Sprague, William, 75, 115, 188. Stanhope, Arthur Philip, Lord Mahon, 241. Stanton, Edwin MeMasters, 234, 247, 248, 264, 266; daughter, 314. Starr, JamesSpaulding, —, 26. Spies, Rebel, 244. Spotsylvania, operations near, 104. Sprague, William, 75, 115, 188. Stanhope, Arthur Philip, Lord Mahon, 241. Stanton, Edwin MeMasters, 234, 247, 248, 264, 266; daughter, 314. Starr, James, 104. Stephenson, Sussex Vane, captain, 49. Steuart, George H., 111. Stevenson, Thomas Greely, 95, 116. Stony Creek station, 285. Stragglers and pillaging, 117, 331; Barlow and, 157; Warren and, 291. Stuart, James Ewell Brown, 18; death, 125. Summerhayes, John Wyer, 268. Sumner, Charles, 78. Surgeon, English fusileer, 115. Sutherland's station, 339, 341. Swede, a visiting, 41, 63; indignation of a, 262. Sykes, George, 34, 52, 53, 60, 80; visited, 8; at dinner, 72. Ta,<