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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 68 2 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.8 (search)
building, over the door of which was the sign, Speake and McCreary, Wholesale and Commission Merchanhis world, and he feared that if his friend James Speake had seen cotton fluff and dust on my jacketoked first-rate. By the time we returned to Speake and McCreary's store, Mr. James Speake had puts, or what connection he had with the store of Speake and McCreary. I was in the midst of strangersd deal of safe business in produce both with Mr. Speake and other wholesale merchants. He travelledthat they became undisguisedly angry because Mr. Speake happened to ask them why some order for good morning, by half-past 6, I was at the door of Speake and McCreary's store, fit for any amount of wowhen we burst upon them with the discovery. Mr. Speake was astonished and exclaimed, There now, whoet where he had placed his bucket; but, when Mr. Speake took him by the collar and led him to the br his knees, and begged his master's pardon. Mr. Speake was, however, too angry to listen to him, an[18 more...]
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.9 (search)
, from over-fastidiousness. It much surprised him that none of my relations had discovered in me what had struck him and Speake. Had he searched New Orleans all through, he said, he could not have found one who would have shared his views respecting me with more sympathy than his friend; and, had Mr. Speake lived, he added, I should have been as good as established for life. Mr. Speake had written his estimates of my character often, and, in one letter, had predicted that I was cut out for a Mr. Speake had written his estimates of my character often, and, in one letter, had predicted that I was cut out for a great merchant, who would eventually be an honour to the city. Mr. Kitchen, the book-keeper, had also professed to be impressed with my qualities; while young Richardson had said I was a prodigy of activity and quick grasp of business. Then, at s, of the long-desired child, he determined to do the best he could for me, and had obtained my engagement with his friend Speake. When he had gone home, his wife had been much interested in the adventure with me, and had often asked how his protege
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
189. Socialism, thoughts on, 530. Soldiering, 167-215. Solomon's Throne, 248. Soul and mind, thoughts on, 521, 522. Spain, Stanley in, 240-244. Speake, James, 89, 102-105, 121. Speake, Mrs., 105, 106. Speke, Mr., 435, 462. Stairs, Lieutenant, 354, 360, 381, 390. Stanley, Denzil, Stanley's son, 483, 485, 486. Speake, Mrs., 105, 106. Speke, Mr., 435, 462. Stairs, Lieutenant, 354, 360, 381, 390. Stanley, Denzil, Stanley's son, 483, 485, 486. Stanley, Henry Morton, his progenitors, 3, 4; dawn of consciousness, 4; earliest recollections, 4-7; his grandfather, 7, 8; at the Prices', 8-10; taken to the Work. house, 10; his first flogging, 13, 14; his second memorable whipping, 14, 15; life at the school, 16-22; his feelings at the death of Willie Roberts, 22, 23; his reliStanleys, 100, 101; his salary increased, 101; his discovery of a theft in the business house, 102-104; Mr. Stanley's gift of books to, 105; watches the body of Mr. Speake, 105, 106; adventure with Dick (Alice) Heaton, 107-111; discharged from Ellison and McMillan's, 106; his account of the death of Mrs. Stanley, 111-113; attends