Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Spear or search for Spear in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

ed to quarters to fire on the Confederates, and nineteen of her men were killed and wounded. The Confederates inflicted in this action a loss of 44, and suffered a loss of 1 3 killed and 57 wounded. On the 2d of October, General Peck sent Colonel Spear, with 1,700 men and some artillery, to Franklin, Va., on the Blackwater, to attack the Confederates at that point, and if possible to destroy a floating bridge there. The place was defended by Col. J. K. Marshall, of the Fifty-second North Carolina. Spear reached the river on the 3d, and a lively skirmish took place across the river. In spite of the fact that General Peck reported his force as having inflicted a loss of from 75 to 200, the Confederate casualties were 2 wounded. General Foster with 5,oco men left Washington, N. C., for Williamston, on the 2d of November. At Little creek and at Rawls' mill, spirited resistance to his advance was offered by the Confederates, and Foster lost 6 killed and 8 wounded. The Confedera
d Richmond. The troops under his command took part in some minor engagements during this time. On the 26th of June, Colonel Spear, with a cavalry force numbering 1,050 men, Spear's Report, Rebellion Records, XXVII, p. 796. moved from the White Spear's Report, Rebellion Records, XXVII, p. 796. moved from the White House to destroy the bridge over the South Anna river. The bridge was defended by 125 men, commanded by Lieut.-Col. T. L. Hargrove, of the Forty-fourth North Carolina regiment. Colonel Spear says of Colonel Hargrove's battle, He held the bridge manColonel Spear says of Colonel Hargrove's battle, He held the bridge manfully for over an hour, when by a stratagem he found me in his rear and his entire force captured. Colonel Hargrove had 7 men killed and 13 wounded. An expedition under General Getty was sent by the Federals to destroy the bridges over the Southoops, especially Whitford's battalion, and a loss of 32 men was entailed upon it. On the 28th of July, Gen. M. W. Ransom, with four companies and a section of artillery, routed, at Jackson, N. C., a cavalry force of 650 men under Colonel Spear.