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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Spenser or search for Spenser in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
ising. The Law School numbered seventy pupils; and Professor Greenleaf, sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judicial service, found himself overburdened with work. In literature there was new activity. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isabella, his first work, was winning golden opinions, and he was making researches for his Conquest of Mexico. Cleveland was writing the Life of Henry Hudson for Sparks's American Biography, and editing Sallust. Hillard was completing his edition of Spenser. Felton was preparing a Greek Reader, and translating Menzel's History of German Literature. Longfellow published The Psalm of Life in Sept., 1838, and a few months later Hyperion and The Voices of the Night. Dr. Lieber visited Boston to superintend the publication of the Political Ethics. Motley was writing Morton's Hope. Greenleaf was gathering the materials for a treatise upon The Law of Evidence. Story was in the full tide of authorship, writing and printing The Law of Agency, and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
a fine scholar, and deeply versed in English literature and the British Constitution. Jan. 16, 1839. This London is socially a bewitching place. Last evening I first dined with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner!
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
Jan. 16, 1839. This London is socially a bewitching place. Last evening I first dined with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
me to see the Lansdownes and Hollands, but I decline. Yesterday, I fell upon the last North American. North American, Jan., 1840, Vol. L. Felton's article on Longfellow's Hyperion, pp. 145-161. Cleveland's article on Hillard's edition of Spenser's Poetical Works, pp. 174-206. It was precious to me, for it reflected four dear friends. There I saw in the lucid page yourself and Cleveland, Longfellow and Felton. Beautifully written and turned was Cleveland's article; well-poised and carefe! To throw aside the dreamy morning-gown and slippers, and pull on the boots of hard work! Let it come! I am content. But who will employ me? I have read with great delight your Agency, Longfellow's Hyperion, and Hillard's Introduction to Spenser,—three entertaining productions. Love to all your family. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To George S. Hillard. London, March 28, 1840. dear Hillard,—These are my last words to you from this side. I sail from Portsmouth,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
since filled the division of time called a week. This number entered with Noah into the ark; of every clean beast, said the Lord, thou shalt take to thee by sevens. And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat. He went on in this way, running through all literature, ancient and modern, in the most extraordinary fashion, quoting from the Old and New Testaments, Aeschylus, Ovid, Virgil, Homer, Juvenal, Shakspeare, Donne, Milton, Spenser, Dryden, Statius, Cicero, Niebuhr, Tertullian, Aulus Gellius, Sir Thomas Brown, &c It happened that these remarks on The number seven occupied all the space that could be devoted to the subject of the article in a single number of the magazine; it also happened that arrangements had been made to publish an article by Judge Fletcher, so that it was two months before the conclusion of Sumner's essay could appear, which was headed American Law journals. It began thus: In a former num