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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for William Sprague or search for William Sprague in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
son, Thomas H. Hicks. Massachusetts.--Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson. Michigan.--Zachary Chandler, Jacob M. Howard. Minnesota.--Alexander Ramsay, M. S. Wilkinson. Missouri.--B. Gratz Brown, J. B. Henderson. New Hampshire.--John P. Hale, Daniel Clarke. Yew Jersey.--William Wright, John C. Ten Eyck. New York.--Edwin D. Morgan, Ira Harris. Ohio.--Benjamin F. Wade, John Sherman. Oregon.--Benjamin F. Harding, G. W. Nesmith. Pennsylvania.--Charles R. Buckalew, Edward Cowan. Rhode Island.--William Sprague, Henry B. Anthony. Vermont.--Solomon Foot, Jacob Collamer. Virginia.--John S. Carlile. West Virginia.--Waitman T. Willey, P. G. Van Winkle. Wisconsin.--James R. Doolittle, Timothy O. Howe. Hannibal Hamlin, Vice-President of the Republic and President of the Senate. House of Representatives. California.--Thomas B. Shannon, William Higbee, Cornelius Cole. Connecticut.--Henry C. Deming, James E. English, Augustus Brandegee, John H. Hubbard. Delaware.--Nathaniel B. Smithers. Illinoi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
f the roads leading from Atlanta to Decatur, which did great execution on the 22d of July, as it appeared when the writer sketched it, in May, 1866. it was in the woods seen in front of it, and not more than eighty rods distant from it, that McPherson was killed. Here was the place of some of the heaviest fighting in the battle of Atlanta. Augusta, engaged in destroying the railway there, attempted to capture McPherson's wagon-train at the former town. But Colonel (afterward General) Sprague, in command there, so skillfully guarded the wagons that he succeeded in sending all but three of them out of the reach of danger. The lull in the battle was brief. The Confederates soon charged up the railway and main Decatur road, scattering an advanced regiment acting as pickets, and capturing its two guns in battery at the foot of a tall pine-tree, used as a signal station. This station was for the purpose of directing the fire of the Nationals on the Confederate army, the countr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
hearts of the loyal millions. In that message the President urged the House of Representatives to concur with the Senate in adopting a Thirteenth Amendment of the National Constitution, for prohibiting slavery in the Republic forever. The Senate had adopted it April 8, 1864. at the preceding session by the strong vote of thirty-eight to six. The following was the vote: yeas.--Maine--Fessenden, Morrill; Yew Hampshire, Clark, Hall; Massachusetts--Sumner, Wilson; Rhode Island--Anthony, Sprague; Connecticut--Dixon, Foster; Vermont--Collamer, Foot: New York, Harris, Morgan; New Jersey, Tenyck; Pennsylvania--Cowan; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; Michiyan--Chandler, Howard; Iowa--Grimes, Harlan; Wisconsin--Doolittle, Howe; Minnesota--Ramsay, Wilkinson; Kansas--Lane, Pomeroy; Oregon--Harding, Nesmith; California--Conness.--38. Only two of these affirmative votes were D
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
y member of the Senate was present, and voted. Thirty-five pronounced the President guilty, and nineteen declared him not guilty. He escaped legal conviction by one vote. The vote of the Senate was as follows:-- For Conviction--Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Howard, Howe, Morgan, Morrill of Vermont, Morrill of Maine, Morton, Nye, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson and Yates. These were all Republicans. For Acquittal--Messrs. Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Fowler, Grimes, Henderson, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Norton, Patterson of Tennessee, Ross, Saulsbury, Trumbull, Van Winkle and Vickers. Eight of these, namely: Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Saulsbury and Vickers, were elected to the Senate as Democrats. The remainder were electe