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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for William Sprague or search for William Sprague in all documents.

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orgia, Alabama, and other Southern States, began to clamor and shout for Secession. They seemed so absorbingly intent on getting, for once, on the stronger side, that they forgot the controlling fact that the side on which God is has always at last the majority. The early State Elections of 1860 had not been favorable to the Republicans. They had begun by carrying New Hampshire by 4,443--a satisfactory majority; but were next beaten in Rhode Island--an independent ticket, headed by William Sprague for Governor, carrying the State over theirs, by 1,460 majority. In Connecticut, Gov. Buckingham had been re-elected by barely 541 majority, in nearly 80,000 votes — the heaviest poll ever had there at a State Election. It was evident that harmony at Charleston would have rendered the election of a Democratic President morally certain. But, after the disruption there, things were bravely altered. Maine, early in September, elected a Republican Governor by 18,091 majority; Vermont di
e authority and maintain the integrity of the Union. The only Those of California and Oregon were exceptions; but, being far away, and not called on for Militia, their views were then undeveloped. Governor not elected as a Republican was William Sprague, of Rhode Island--an independent conservative --who not merely raised promptly the quota required of him, but volunteered to lead it to Washington, or wherever its services might be required. No State was more prompt and thorough in her resey did not choose to take without buying, they hungrily marched, building bridges and laying rails by turns, throughout the day and the following night. The Seventy-first New York followed the next day, and passed, four miles out, the camp of Gov. Sprague's Rhode Island regiment, by whom they were generously supplied with provisions. Arrived at the Annapolis Junction, the soldiers were met by cars from Washington, in which they proceeded on the 25th--the New York Seventh in the advance — to th
n organized or enlisted, during that springtide of National enthusiasm, for any term short of the duration of the war. VII. It is impossible not to perceive that the Rebel troops were better handled, during the conflict, than ours. Gen. McDowell, who does not appear to have actively participated in any former battle but that of Buena Vista, where he served as Aid to Gen. Wool, seems to have had very little control over the movements of his forces after the beginning of the conflict. Gov. Sprague, who fought through the day as brigadier with the 2d Rhode Island, whose Colonel, Slocum, and Major, Ballou, were both left dead on the battle-field, observed to one who asked him, near the close of the fight, what were his orders, that he had been fighting all day without any. In short, our army was projected like a bolt, not wielded like a sword. VIII. Although our army, before fighting on that disastrous day, was largely composed of the bravest and truest patriots in the Union, it
in 11790 ; troops furnished during the Revolution, 36; 37; first manumission society in, 107; emancipates her slaves, 108; legislative attempts against Abolition, 125; 300: State election of 1860, 326; State troops proceed to Washington under Gov. Sprague, 469. Richardson, Col. J. B., at Bull Run,539; 549. Richardson, Wm. A., of Ill., reports bill organizing Nebraska, 225; 233; moves an amendment, 234. Richmond, Va., Breckinridge Convention at, 318; the focus of Disunion intrigues, 4510. 351; 407; forts occupied by State troops, 409; 410; sends Commissioners to Washington, 411; Col. Hayne sent, 412. See Charleston, Fort Sumter, etc. Spain, her traffic in slaves, 27-8; 54; the Holy Alliance, 266. See Cuba, Ostend, etc. Sprague, Gov. Wm., of R. I., 326; 469; 552. Squatter Sovereign, The, citation from, 237. Stanton, Frederick P., Sec'y of Kansas, 249. Staunton Spectator, The, 478. Star of the West, The, attempts to relieve Sumter, 412; seized at Indianola,