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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 13 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for J. G. Sproston or search for J. G. Sproston in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
ts: first launch, Lieut. J. H. Russell, commanding the expedition, 39 men; first cutter, Lieut. J. G. Sproston, 18 men second cutter, F. B. Blake, 26 men; third cutter, Midshipman J. Steece, 17 men; in all the expedition there were 100 officers, sailors and marines. The plan was for Lieut. Sproston and Midshipman Steece to land with their boats' crews and (if possible) spike the two guns moune schooner's deck. The sailors sprang to their oars, and in less time than one could think Lieuts. Sproston and Steece from their respective boats sprung upon the wharf, followed by their men, and maguarding the guns, and he was shot down by gunner Bireton as he was in the act of firing on Lieut. Sproston, both weapons going off at the same time. In the darkness the party became separated, and Lieut. Sproston and the gunner succeeded in finding the guns, which they immediately spiked. Then came the contest for the schooner, which was a severe one while it lasted. In addition to the cre
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
its flight was wild and range short. As I fired once myself, I know they were not to be depended on, and the captain of the gun was much disappointed at his results. During the engagement an officer was kept at the mast-head, whose duty it was to report our firing, by which we were governed. I have, therefore, reason to believe that our fire was effective. Few of our crew have served before in a vessel-of-war, and as we went into commission only three weeks before the engagement, Mr. Sproston, the first-lieutenant of the vessel, fired nearly all the 11-inch shells with his own hands. Of him, as well as of the officers and crew generally, I have to express my warmest commendations, and my surprise that amidst such a shower of shot and shells we received no damage. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Daniel Ammen, Lieutenant-Commander Seneca. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Conmmanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Report of Lieutenant-Commander T. H
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
its flight was wild and range short. As I fired once myself, I know they were not to be depended on, and the captain of the gun was much disappointed at his results. During the engagement an officer was kept at the mast-head, whose duty it was to report our firing, by which we were governed. I have, therefore, reason to believe that our fire was effective. Few of our crew have served before in a vessel-of-war, and as we went into commission only three weeks before the engagement, Mr. Sproston, the first-lieutenant of the vessel, fired nearly all the 11-inch shells with his own hands. Of him, as well as of the officers and crew generally, I have to express my warmest commendations, and my surprise that amidst such a shower of shot and shells we received no damage. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Daniel Ammen, Lieutenant-Commander Seneca. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Conmmanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Report of Lieutenant-Commander T. H