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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 11 9 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
o Europe. In consultation with him, it was settled, that, after he had advised with Dr. Gardiner, Chief Justice Parker, and other friends, I should go to Europe, and study for two or three years. I therefore gave up my office, and turned all my attention and effort to learning what I could of the German language, and German universities, to which my thoughts and wishes had been already turned as the best places for education. The first intimation I ever had on the subject was from Mme. de Stael's work on Germany, then just published. My next came from a pamphlet, published by Villers,—to defend the University of Gottingen from the ill intentions of Jerome Bonaparte, the King of Westphalia,—in which he gave a sketch of the University, and its courses of study. My astonishment at these revelations was increased by an account of its library, given, by an Englishman who had been at Gottingen, to my friend, the Rev. Samuel C. Thacher. I was sure that I should like to study at suc
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
coming from her house the other day, after having left them, I met him most unexpectedly on the Boulevards. Since then I have seen him two or three times at his lodgings and my own, and to-day I have dined with him at Mad. de Stael's, or rather with her daughter, the Duchess de Broglie, who now receives her mother's friends; long illness preventing her receiving them herself. The company was not large,—Sir Humphry and Lady Davy, Baron Humboldt, the Duke de Laval, Augustus Schlegel, Auguste de Stael, and the Duke and Duchess de Broglie,—but it was not on that account less agreeable. It was the first time that I had felt anything of the spirit and charm of French society, which has been so much talked of since the time of Louis XIV.; and it is curious that on this occasion more than half the company were foreigners, and that the two who entertained the rest more than any others were Germans. It is but fair to say, however, that Baron Hmnboldt and M. de Schlegel have been so long i
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
Paris, and I have not left any city with so little regret. A few friends, indeed, I have left there, to whom I owe many favors and much genuine kindness; but I never knew so many people, and knew them so long, where I found so much occasion to be familiar, and so little to be intimate; where there was so much to amuse, and so little to attach my affections. Two of those who have seemed to take the most interest in me, and whose kindness I shall never forget,—the Duke de Broglie and Auguste de Stael,—proposed to me to accompany them to La Grange, where they were to visit General Lafayette, without company. The General had often invited me to visit him, and as his chateau is not far from the route I was to follow to Switzerland I accompanied them. I was much touched this morning by the Duke's kindness, in having asked M. Sismondi to meet me at breakfast, he having arrived last evening only, from Geneva, and whom I could not otherwise have seen. He is about fifty, a plain man in
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
Letters to Mr. Ticknor from Mr. Jefferson, the Duke de Laval, Count Cesare Balbo, Madame de Broglie, and Baron Auguste de Stael. During his absence from home, Mr. Ticknor received many letters and notes from persons eminent on both sides itten by the Ex-President to Mr. Ticknor. Those from the Duke de Laval, from Cesare Balbo, Madame de Broglie, and Auguste de Stael are interesting in themselves, and full of vivacity; and they bear still more the marks of that individuality, on boeler du mystere. Dites moi aussi, si l'on vous parle de l'ouvrage de ma mere. The brother of Madame de Broglie, Auguste de Stael, a young man of distinguished ability, and of a singularly pure and elevated character, was one of those who, like Cion suffers so much from a sea voyage, that I have but little hopes of seeing America, though it be one of my most earnest desires. Forgive this broken English of mine, and believe me most faithfully yours. Sis felix et memor nostri. A. Stael.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
thtown, the old priests have been removed, and Jesuits placed in their stead. After lunch,—there is only one service in the church,—Miss Edgeworth showed me a good many curious letters from Dumont,— one in particular, giving an account of Madame de Stael's visit, in 1813, to Lord Lansdowne at Bowood, for a week, when Mackintosh, Romilly, Schlegel, Rogers, and a quantity more of distinguished people were there; but Miss Edgeworth declined, not feeling apparently willing to live in a state of continual exhibition for so long a time. It was, however, very brilliant, and was most brilliantly described by Dumont. One thing amused me very much. Madame de Stael, who had just been reading the Tales of Fashionable Life,—then recently published,—with great admiration, said to Dumont of Miss Edgeworth: Vraiment elle était digne de l'enthousiasme, mais elle se perd dans votre triste utilitye. It seemed to delight Miss Edgeworth excessively, and it was to show me this that she looked u
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
great authority to his opinions, though they reach the public only through papers on a wonderful variety of subjects, which he gives to the periodicals. Lamartine's brilliant tribute to him is quoted in the Life of Prescott. Mr. Ticknor highly valued his correspondence with Count Circourt, which continued with undiminished interest to the last. Madame de Circourt was a most distinguished person, of rare talents and brilliant acquirements; and was called by M. de Bonstetten a second Madame de Stael, he having been a contemporary and admirer of the first. a Frenchman, whom I have met here occasionally, with a very intellectual Russian wife, who, like himself, is pretty deep in Dante. The Count is a Carlist, and was private secretary —though yet a young man—under the Ministry of Prince Polignac, and, to the honor of his personal consistency, refuses now to wear the tricolored cockade. The consequence is, that diplomatic etiquette will not permit the minister to present him at Cour
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
k so much; is still pretty; and has that charm she always had, of perfectly simple and even naive manners, added to great frankness and talent. Her daughter, the Viscountess d'haussonville, was there, and is beautiful; . . . . and a M. Doudan, who is a sort of secretary to the Duke, and who has the reputation of beaucoup de moyens. We talked chiefly about old times, and the changes that years have brought,—the death of their beautiful daughter Pauline, and of Miss Randall; the death of Auguste de Stael, etc.,—till Villemain came in, who has grown quite stout, with his added reputation, and then I came away, promising to dine with them to-morrow, and meet Guizot, who is expected in town on business to-night. I asked the Duke about Confalonieri's case; and he said he was as much in the dark about it as everybody else, and extremely sorry not to find him in Paris. . . . October 6.—I dined at the de Broglies', and went an hour before dinner, because Mad. de Broglie said she wanted me <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
nothing else in my thoughts, though I am busy with things and people all day long. Your letter came evening before last (Tuesday). I have read it a dozen times, and thanked you for it many more times than I have read it. Farewell. . . . . Yours always, Geo. Ticknor. When the party first reached Paris the Duc de Broglie was still in town, and also Madame de Stael, whom Mr. Ticknor had never seen, but who received him warmly, and in whom he took a great interest, as the widow of Auguste de Stael, Of Madame de Stael, nee Vernet, Baron Bunsen says in a letter, printed in his Memoirs: The combined impression made by her manner, countenance, and conversation, prepares one to believe, and even to guess, at all the great and good qualities attributed to her. with whom he had been so intimate during his first youthful visit in France. These friends, with their delightful coterie,—Doudan, Villemain, Madame de Ste. Aulaire, M. and Mad. d'haussonville, and others of the Duc de Brogli
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 25: (search)
s judgments carefully and to be just. If, however, he had noted a fact in the career or the character of a man which distinctly indicated a moral want in his nature, he never forgot it. The welcome he received, before he attained his majority, among the clever men of his own community,—lawyers, preachers, and merchants who had seen the world; Mr. Jefferson's approbation of him as a representative of American youth, shown by his voluntary offer of letters of introduction for Europe; Madame de Stael's determination, after her children had seen him enough to describe him to her, that she would see him whether her physicians gave permission or not,—are but the early signs of the attraction and resources he bore about him. His early experience of society in Paris and London was calculated to ingraft on the somewhat grave and formal courtesy of his home circle more promptitude and presence of mind in conversation, and to introduce the same element into the expression of that deference
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Spencer, Second Earl, I. 269, 295, II. 466. Spencer, Third Earl (Honest Althorp) I. 442, 443, 444, 445, 11. 170, 171, 172 173. Spinola, Marquis, II. 342. Sprengel, Professor, 1. Ill, 112, 113. Stackelberg, Count, I. 4(30. Stael, Auguste, Baron de, I. 128, 138, 139 151, 155, 312, II. 36, 37, 104: writings, I 314 and note; letter from, 313. Stael, Madame de, 1. 11, 57, 60, 61, 98, 119 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 132, 133, 136, 138 151, 189, 213, 430, 497, 498, 11. 37, 134, 355, 4Stael, Madame de, 1. 11, 57, 60, 61, 98, 119 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 132, 133, 136, 138 151, 189, 213, 430, 497, 498, 11. 37, 134, 355, 498. Stael, Madame la Baronne Auguste de, II. 354 and note. Stafford, Marchioness of, II. 332 Stanhope, Countess of, II. 359, 365, 387, 388, 389. Stanhope, Earl of, II. 322, 323, 359, 362, 364. 365, 366, 3S7, 388, 389, 462. Stanhope, Lady, Evelyn, II. 364. Stanley, II. 181. Stanley, Bishop of Norwich, II. 178. Stanley, Hon. Edward (Fourteenth Earl ol Derby), I. 408 note, II. 479; translation of the Iliad, 471. Stanley, Hon. Mr., I. 424. Stanley, Lord (Fifteenth Earl of D