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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,012 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 105 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 89 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 48 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 43 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 30 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for David S. Stanley or search for David S. Stanley in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
as, Colonel Deitzler; Second Kansas, Colonel Mitchell; two companies First Regular Cavalry, Captains Stanley and Carr; three companies First Regular Cavalry (recruits), Lieutenant Lathrop; Captain Totr Infantry, under Captain Steele, supported by another of the Fourth Regular Cavalry, under Captain Stanley, which held the advanced position on the left. Owing to the ridges in the valley, the real large force of Confederates suddenly emerged from the woods, to cut off Steele's infantry from Stanley's cavalry. The latter (about a hundred and fifty strong) immediately drew up his men in properhey returned the fire, and a regular battle seemed about to open, when a subordinate officer in Stanley's command shouted Charge! and twenty-five horsemen dashed in among the Confederate infantry, hewing them down with their sabers with fearful slaughter. Stanley could do nothing better than sustain the irregular order; but before he could reach the heroic little band with re-enforcements, the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
land. That of the Nationals was fifty-one killed and wounded. Report of General John Pope to General Cullum, March 14, 1862; and statements to the author by eye witnesses. Just before daylight on the morning after the siege, Brigadier-General David S. Stanley, whose command had been in the trenches all night, was relieved by Major-General Schuyler Hamilton; and, a little after dawn, a flag of truce appeared with information that the place was abandoned. When the fact was certified, Haminsports in the river between the island and New Madrid, so as to. form, as they supposed, effectual obstructions to navigation, they abandoned every thing and fled. It was important to capture the fugitives, and for that purpose Pope directed Stanley and Hamilton, who had come down by land, to cross their divisions. He pushed his troops on toward Tiptonville as fast as they were landed. They met and drove back the Confederates, who were attempting to fly toward Union City. These were join
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
to Corinth or destroy it, Rosecrans marched westward with Stanley's division to Clear east of Corinth, and encamped. Meanwhans, meanwhile, moved with the separated divisions of Generals Stanley and C. S. Hamilton from Clear Spring with about nine ately directed by Brigadier-Generals Sanborn and Sullivan, Stanley's division had come up, but the nature of the ground was sfederates back to the ravine, participated in the battle. Stanley himself had been for some time at the front, assisting Ham, expecting to renew the conflict in the morning; but when Stanley went forward at dawn for the purpose, he found that Price on's division was moved so as to touch Davies's right, and Stanley took position in close ├ęchelon with McKean, near Corinth. National center. Davies was pushed back. He called upon Stanley for aid. Colonel Mower was sent with a brigade, and had jums, from Battery Williams (which, with Robinett, protected Stanley's division), opened his 20-pounder Parrott guns upon it, a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
isions. The right, composed of the divisions of General J. W. Sill, Philip H. Sheridan, and Colonel W. E. Woodruff, was placed in charge of Major-General Alexander McD. McCook; the center, under Major-General George H. Thomas, composed of the divisions of General L. H. Rousseau, J. S. Negley, E. Dumont, and S. S. Fry; and the left, under T. L. Crittenden, composed of the divisions of Generals T J. Wood, H. P. Van Cleve, and W. S. Smith. Rosecrans placed the cavalry in charge of Major-General D. S. Stanley, of the Army of the Mississippi, and appointed the accomplished Julius P. Garesche his Chief of Staff. Captain J. St. Clair Morton was his Chief Engineer, and Colonel William Truesdall was appointed Chief of the Army Police. The services of the latter officer cannot be too highly estimated. He gathered about him an army of spies and scouts, and designed a detective system of great perfection, by which the active friends of the Confederates of both sexes were found out, and their