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Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 2 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 1 1 Browse Search
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Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., III: a word more about America. (search)
far as politics are concerned, of the question of church disestablishment. He is eager to set to work at a change which, even if it were desirable (and I think it is not), is yet off the line of those reforms which are really pressing. Mr. Lyulph Stanley, Professor Stuart, and Lord Richard Grosvenor are waiting ready to help him, and perhaps Mr. Chamberlain himself will lead the attack. I admire Mr. Chamberlain as a politician, because he has the courage — and it is a wise courage — to stan provinces, not as a general measure for the whole country. In other words, the endeavor for disestablishment ought to be postponed to the endeavor for far more important reforms, not to precede it. Yet I doubt whether Mr. Chamberlain and Mr. Lyulph Stanley will listen to me when I plead thus with them; there is so little lucidity in England, and they will say I am priest-ridden. One man there is, whom above all others I would fain have seen in Parliament during the last ten years, and behe
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
for Women he listened to June 25. speeches by the Earl of Shaftesbury, Mr. Stansfeld, Mrs. James Stansfeld, Henry Fawcett. Westlake, Prof. Fawcett, Miss Jex Blake, and Dr. Garrett-Anderson. He also heard a liberal discourse by Dean Sophia Jex Blake. Stanley at St. Stephen's. One of his pleasantest mornings June 24. was spent at Argyll Lodge, in Kensington, where he breakfasted with the Duke and Duchess of Argyll and their June 23. daughters,—John Bright, Hon. Charles Howard, and Hon. Lyulph Stanley being the other guests; and he had a cheerful interview also with Lord Houghton, who was just then June 28. confined to his room by a painful accident, but who insisted on seeing him, though other callers were turned away. The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society would not consent to Mr. Garrison's leaving London without receiving some mark of attention from them. Among the fifty gentlemen present at the breakfast which they June 26. tendered him, at the Devonshire House Hot