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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 189 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 65 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 6 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 38 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 33 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 30 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for D. S. Stanley or search for D. S. Stanley in all documents.

Your search returned 97 results in 11 document sections:

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to Catoosa Platform, south of Hooker's Gap. Stanley's division formed the centre. Fortificationsivision in on the right centre to support General Stanley, but the enemy presented so weak a front that Stanley was able to accomplish all that was expected — the turning of the enemy's left flank bny emergency that may arise. The brigades in Stanley's division of the Fourth corps engaged, were Illinois. General Cruft held the right of Stanley's line, and when the forward movement was ordnd Newton's division, of Howard's, followed. Stanley relieved Davis at the mouth of Buzzard Roost ed gradually up to the enemy's work, Wood and Stanley pressing closely the extreme rebel right. Fuon a portion of our line. Cruft's brigade of Stanley's division occupied an advanced position to ta gap of half a mile between Judah's left and Stanley's right, which was promptly filled by cavalry the line and commenced moving to the left of Stanley, whose flank was covered by McCook's cavalry,[28 more...]
e their morning's ablutions. Red Clay is left in the rear, and a slow and tedious march is made, with roads blocked up by cavalry upon Catoosa Springs, which was reached about two o'clock in the afternoon. A line of battle was at once formed, with the left (Newton's division) resting near Burke's Mill, three miles east of the Springs, and the right (Wood's division) joining Baird's division of the Fourteenth corps, which had been thrown forward to Catoosa Platform, south of Hooker's Gap. Stanley's division formed the centre. Fortifications of a temporary kind were at once thrown up, heavy lines of pickets thrown out in front, while General Edward McCook's cavalry division guarded our left flank, and General Kilpatrick's our right. I must not neglect to mention that, as we moved down from Red Clay to Catoosa Springs, a portion of General McCook's division of cavalry took the lead and had a few slight skirmishes with the enemy, driving them from our front upon their reserve. Sev
ning the Fourth corps encamped on the hills about Catoosa Springs, moved east, Stanley taking the lead, followed by Generals Newton and Wood, arriving at Lee's Housee northwest of Rocky Face Ridge. Newton's division halted in line of battle. Stanley, with kis invincible division, moved forward about a mile further, on the leftard's intention to throw Wood's division in on the right centre to support General Stanley, but the enemy presented so weak a front that Stanley was able to accompliStanley was able to accomplish all that was expected — the turning of the enemy's left flank by a movement along Tunnel Hill range to the hill immediately in front of the town. At ten o'clocy, could be discerned on the ridge commanding the town. Whitaker's brigade of Stanley's division at once moved forward up the moderate slope of the range occupied bhat proved them to be equal for any emergency that may arise. The brigades in Stanley's division of the Fourth corps engaged, were commanded by Generals Whitaker an
nd of the Fourteenth and Twenty--third corps, in addition to his own corps, ordered forward General Stanley's division on the centre to make a demonstration to develop the enemy's strength and positiundred and Thirteenth Ohio, and the Seventy-eighth Illinois. General Cruft held the right of Stanley's line, and when the forward movement was ordered sent the Thirty-first Indiana out as skirmishof February. Brigadier-General Wood's skirmishers were engaged during the day on the left of Stanley extending to the base of Rocky Face. The day has not brought on a regular engagement, thoughent guns, which are completely under their control. To-day General Howard rode out to meet General Stanley, and in conversation, about a mile from the front, received a bullet through his coat. Themeet General Stanley, and in conversation, about a mile from the front, received a bullet through his coat. The same ball passed through the hat of Captain Kniffin, commissary of Stanley's division.
but a few hundred yards in advance of where it was last night. During the afternoon Wood's and Stanley's divisions of the Fourth corps made an assault upon the base of Rocky Face from the valley witt seventy wounded and six killed. At eleven o'clock, and previous to the assault by Wood and Stanley, the enemy opened upon Johnson's division from a mountain howitzer, planted on the summit of a hird shot taking effect in the howitzer, and silencing it until in the afternoon, when Wood and Stanley made their demonstration, and called out a vigorous artillery and musketry fire along the whole line. At four o'clock, General Howard ordered the divisions of Stanley and Wood forward into the gaps facing the enemy's breastworks and fortifications to the right of Dalton. The movement had ttion of his batteries. From five until after dark a heavy fire was kept up, and when it ceased Stanley was far in advance of Davis' position of the morning, and extended his line some distance up th
of an hour followed. At half-past 8, Davis's artillery awoke the enemy from their meditations upon Lee's discomfitures, by vigorous shelling, which drew forth no response for some time. Late in the afternoon a few guns opened from a point on Rocky Face, when Brydge's Illinois battery was moved into position, and opened upon the battery on the ridge. The third shot was effective, and was placed among the rebel guns, which were silenced for an hour. At one o'clock it again opened upon Stanley's line of battle, exposed in the fields in the valleys. The Fifth Indiana battery took position, and, in conjunction with Brydge's, promptly silenced the fire from Rocky Face. For some time all was quiet; the rain poured down in torrents, as though Heaven had opened its flood-gates to deluge the earth. For half an hour together not a sound was heard, except the occasional witticism from a mirth-provoking soldier, and the reparte of his companions, interrupted by an occasional report of a
Doc. 17. the battle of Nashville. General J. T. Wood's report. headquarters Fourth Army corps, Huntsville, Ala., Jan. 5, 1865. General: The Fourth army corps arrived in the vicinity of Nashville, on the retreat from Pulaski, on the first December ultimo. Major-General D. S. Stanley, having been wounded in the conflict at Franklin, on the thirtieth November, and having received a leave of absence on account of his wound, relinquished, and I assumed, command of the corps on the second of December. So soon as I had assumed command of the corps, I placed it in position as follows, in conformity with orders received from the commanding General of the forces in the field in person: The left of the corps rested on the Casino, and, extending westward across the Granny White and Hilsboro pike, the right rested on the left of the detachment of the Army of the Tennessee (Major-General A. S. Smith's command), midway between the Hilsboro and Harding pikes. As the condition of th
a few rebel skirmishers. Cruft's brigade, of Stanley's division, had the advance, and with the Thim by the rebel artillery. The skirmishers of Stanley's division were the Ninth Indiana, Fifty-nintite ill, but is recovering. General Cruft of Stanley's division, is also very ill, and his brigadehas been acting as Chief of Artillery for General Stanley, finding it impossible to tell where to ded, were much nearer the rebel works than was Stanley's, yet they pushed their divisions forward unpex of the letter. At four o'clock Davis and Stanley made a simultaneous advance. Newton's divihem, until the twenty-seventh of July. Major-General Stanley being assigned to command the corps, I Davis was appointed to his place. Major-General D. S. Stanley had succeeded General Howard in theall things being ready, the Fourth corps, General Stanley, drew out of its lines on our extreme lefof General Jeff. C. Davis' corps, to move General Stanley's corps in connection with General Schofi[19 more...]
ally sever the east from the west. In other words, cut the would-be confederacy in two again, as it had been cut once by our gaining possession of the Mississippi river. General Sherman's plan virtually effected this object. General Sherman commenced at once his preparations for his proposed movement, keeping his army in position in the meantime to watch Hood. Becoming satisfied that Hood had moved westward from Gadsden across Sand mountain, General Sherman sent the Fourth corps Major-General Stanley commanding, and the Twenty-third corps, Major-General Schofield commanding, back to Chattanooga to report to Major-General Thomas, at Nashville, whom he had placed in command of all the troops of his military division, save the four army corps and cavalry division he designed to move with through Georgia. With the troops thus left at his disposal, there was little doubt that General Thomas could hold the line of the Tennessee, or, in the event Hood should force it, would be able to
its east bank. Orders were immediately sent to General Stanley to concentrate the Fourth corps at Pulaski and ourth corps, about twelve thousand, under Major-General D. S. Stanley; the Twenty-third corps, about ten thousa to falling back toward Columbus. Two divisions of Stanley's corps had already reached Lynnville, a point fiftn, holding all the crossings in its vicinity, while Stanley's corps, posted in reserve on the Franklin pike, waeld made preparations to withdraw to Franklin. General Stanley, with one division of infantry, was sent to Sprtack coming from the direction of Huey's Mills. General Stanley reached Spring Hill just in time to drive off twith Ruger's division, started to the relief of General Stanley, at Spring Hill, and when near that place came ficer and thirty-three stands of colors. Major-General D. S. Stanley, commanding Fourth corps, was severely woTo all my sub-commanders (Major-Generals Schofield, Stanley, Rousseau, Steedman, Smith, and Wilson, and Brigadi
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