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The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Correspondence of the Lincoln and Gen. M'Clellan. the Inside history of the Defeats around Richmond — a bitter letter to Secretary Stanton--when McClellan thought he was Safe — the thousand thanks from the Ape. The Northern papers are publishing extracts from the report of Gen. McClellan. We copy from it the letters and telegrams which passed between the defeated Napoleon and the clown as Washington, In one of Lincoln's dispatches, after McClellan's terrible thrashing, occu. If you do not do to now, the game is lost. If I save this army now, I tell you plainly, that I owe no thanks to you, or to any other person in Washington. You have done your best to sacrifice this army. G B. McClellan. To Hon E M Stanton. The army at Marrison's landing. On the 1st of July I received the following from the President: Washington, July 1, 1862--3.30 P. M. Major-Gen. George B. McClellan. It is impossible to rein force you for your present emer
ce will leave Richmond this morning at 6 o'clock for City Point, under Capt. Hatch. Eight of the Federal prisoners who have been paroled will go down in the boat. Five of the paroled parties are officers, viz: Col. Powell, generally known as one-eyed Powell, under stood to be exchanged for Col. Lee; Capt. Stanton, son of Ben Stanton, a former M. C. from Ohio, and Capt. Gault. There are still nearly 1,100 Yankee officers in the Libby, and the prospect of an exchange seems as distant as ever. ce will leave Richmond this morning at 6 o'clock for City Point, under Capt. Hatch. Eight of the Federal prisoners who have been paroled will go down in the boat. Five of the paroled parties are officers, viz: Col. Powell, generally known as one-eyed Powell, under stood to be exchanged for Col. Lee; Capt. Stanton, son of Ben Stanton, a former M. C. from Ohio, and Capt. Gault. There are still nearly 1,100 Yankee officers in the Libby, and the prospect of an exchange seems as distant as ever.