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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
, I want to get away from Washington; I am sick of the intrigues and cross purposes that I find here. Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Stanton seem to me to be about the only persons who are in dead earnest for a vigorous prosecution of the war. Ah, said he, the credit I can. I called on the Secretary of War, and found the President with him. I stated to them the facts. Mr. Stanton was overjoyed. The President did not appear at all elated, but shook hands with me with a far-off, pensive look. I shall need some funds undoubtedly, I said to Mr. Stanton. Please ascertain how much and send to me by the quartermaster and commissary, who will follow me and bring whatever it is supposed I will need. Why not take your requisition yourself? In the first place, I do not want any charge of the money. In the second place, Mr. Stanton, to be honest with you, my orders cannot be countermanded after I get to sea, for I am going to take New Orleans or you will never see me again. Well, sa
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 8: from Hatteras to New Orleans. (search)
hus I was left without the services of a quartermaster and commissary who knew anything about the details of the expedition or its Map of lower Mississippi River provisions. I should have had no notice of what had happened or of the difficulty I was in, for none was given me, had not my brother taken passage in a sailing vessel and come down, giving me the information. He had also, upon his personal responsibility, shipped provisions enough to carry me along, and had given notice to Mr. Stanton that provisions must be sent. These came in due time; otherwise a starving army would have landed in a starving captured city. Again: I hoped to have been at the island two months earlier. I had brought with me more than one hundred Massachusetts mechanics to build boats with which to get through the bayous, lagoons, and morasses in the rear of Fort Jackson or St. Philip, as the case might be, and to construct scaling ladders with which to assault the parapets, rafts on which field a
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 9: taking command of a Southern City. (search)
eestablished, and a collector of customs appointed for my department. Meantime I reported to the War Department as follows:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, May 16, 1862. War Records, Series I., Vol. XV., page 423. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War:-- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In accordance with the terms of my order No. 22 I have caused to be bought a very considerable quantity of sugar, but as yet very little cotton. This has gone very far to reassure the pld able administration of the government of that city also receives warm commendation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . With admiration for your achievements, and the utmost confidence in your continuous success, I remain, Truly yours, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. War Records, Series I., Vol. XV., p. 471. Again, this is evidenced by a very highly prized letter of Mr. Lincoln asking me to come to him even before I returned to my family. Another matter that required instant a
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 10: the woman order, Mumford's execution, etc. (search)
to say, was enforced, and it is also needless to say, was the cause of protests of the foreign consuls in behalf of neutral forsworn rebels. I do not know now that I can put the whole matter of this highly beneficial order, its cause, execution, and results, in better form than that in which I explained it to the Secretary of War officially in answer to those protests, on the application of the Secretary of State:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, October, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Sir:--I have the honor to report the facts and circumstances of my General Order No. 55, in answer to the complaints of the Prussian and French legations, as to the enforcement of that order upon certain inhabitants of New Orleans, claimed to be the subjects of these respective governments. Before discussing the specialty and personal relations of the several complaints, it will be necessary, in a general way, to give an account of the state of things which I f
fered to send this despatch to you. I remain, with respect, your obedient servant, D. G. Farragut, Flag-Officer Commanding. War Records, Vol. XV., p. 514 Stanton had already addressed Halleck on the same subject on the 23d of June, and this communication, here given, must have reached Halleck even before he received Farrag protection of gunboats. A despatch to-day received from General Butler speaks of it as a project contemplated by him, but he may not have a force to spare. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. War Records, Vol. XV., p. 494. Halleck answered Farragut's letter on the 3d of July as follows:-- Corinth, July 3, 1862. flag-ofthe 15th of July Halleck sent the following communication to the Secretary of War in answer to his letter:-- Corinth, Miss., July 15, 1862, 10.40 A. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I cannot at present give Commodore Farragut any aid against Vicksburg. I am sending reinforcements to General Curtis in Arkansas, and
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
shington, seeking reasons interviews with Lincoln, Stanton and Seward double-dealing of the latter shown far I am not at liberty to tell you, but you may ask Mr. Stanton. I should be very happy to see you to-morrow for a consultation. I then called upon Mr. Stanton. He also received me with great cordiality. As soon as the why I was relieved from command at New Orleans? Mr. Stanton replied: The reason was one which does not imply,ell me what I was recalled for. You and I, replied Stanton, laughing, are both lawyers, and it is of no use yotions. If Seward had had the courage to say, or if Stanton would have said and published words amounting to thcan be needed of the opinion of the President and Mr. Stanton of my action in New Orleans, and of the reason of--these were his words to me. General Halleck and Mr. Stanton say substantially the same thing, although the foSenate chamber, 8th Jan., 1863. Dear General:--Mr. Stanton assured me last evening that had he known your re
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
eived by the colored soldiers would release them. The result of this negotiation was communicated to the War Department by the following letter:-- headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, Fortress Monroe, April 9, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Sir:--Upon the last flag of truce boat which carried up Confederate prisoners in our hands, I sent up from Point Lookout some four hundred and odd prisoners, being the wounded and sick Confederates who were sufficientlnded to breed discontent in our armies and was grossly unjust,--as will be seen by the following despatch to the Secretary of War:-- headquarters Army of the James, near Junction of Varina and New market Roads, Oct. 3, 1864, 7.45 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War:-- . . . . . . . . . . . . . I have received a letter from Captain Smith of the navy proposing to Ould an exchange of naval prisoners independently of our commissioner. There have been many negroes captured from the n
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
enemy, and Kilpatrick's men being recruiting from their march at Yorktown, I asked his aid to meet this advance, which was promptly and kindly given, and the movement of the enemy handsomely met and repulsed. When I had reported for duty to Mr. Stanton in obedience to his order to take command, he informed me of the probable importance of my department in the campaign of the coming spring and summer, in which would be a movement upon Richmond. Whereupon in all my spare moments I examined pallmore to move to his front and demonstrate against the railroad for that purpose. He reported to me that he did not make the movement for reasons which appeared to him perfectly satisfactory. On the same morning I received a telegram from Mr. Stanton, giving such information as the department possessed in regard to the operations of General Grant, a copy of which I at once sent to my two corps commanders, Generals Gillmore and Smith, accompanied by despatches urging upon them the necessity
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
d that Butler had laid this report before Baldy Smith and Hancock, and had urged them to make the assault and capture Petersburg before the Army of Northern Virginia came up; but that they, Smith and Hancock, had hesitated and dawdled the night away. . . . About seventy thousand of the good men we had crossed the Rapidan with lay dead behind us, or were in hospitals, or languished in Confederate military prisons. So I, one morning, claimed my discharge, which had been ordered by Secretary of War Stanton while we were fighting in front of Cold Harbor. Getting it, I went to Washington, where a commission in the Fourth United States Artillery awaited me. The reader will now see why the whole Army of the Potomac was repulsed on the nights of the 17th and 18th of June, with plenty of moonlight to fight in, with a loss of prisoners captured, and two thousand killed and wounded. This was the last attempt of the Army of the Potomac to capture Petersburg for many months, save by a mine
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
the field such despatches were retransmitted at General Grant's headquarters. I read these words:-- Report at once in person to the Secretary of War. Edwin M. Stanton. I ordered my vessel to be coaled as soon as possible for two days sailing. I reflected upon the despatch. What could it mean? Was I to be summarily dggest that if I am to go I might be sent there with troops enough to take care of the city, and let me report to General Dix, leaving him in command. But, said Stanton, Dix won't do anything. Although brave enough, he is a very timid man about such matters, as he wants to be governor of New York himself one of these days. Wenotice of my being there got into the New York papers. I arrived in Jersey City the next morning and was met there by a prominent loyal man of New York, one of Stanton's correspondents, who greeted me and desired me to make his house — a very fine one on Fifth Avenue--my headquarters while I remained in the city. I said to hi
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