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and exploded, and went to my headquarters at the front. Decorative Motif. Upon my return General Grant left the command to go to Burlington, N. J., to visit his family, leaving me as senior officer in command of both armies until he returned on the 24th of November. I fix the date of his return by the following telegram to the Secretary of War, which was the last telegram I sent while in command of both armies:-- headquarters Army of the James, Nov. 24, 1864, 11.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: In the absence of Lieutenant-General Grant, I have to report to you that the battery and cavalry horses are suffering for hay, and the government is losing large sums in the depreciation of these horses from this cause. For this there can be no excuse, as there is hay enough in the country. It can only arise from inexcusable remissness somewhere, which needs but to be brought to your attention to be remedied. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. Durin
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
leged causes. General Grant's letter to the Secretary of War and his telegram to the President are as follows:-- City Point, Virginia, Jan. 4, 1865. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I am constrained to request the removal of Maj.-Gen. B. F. Butler from the command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. nes which ought to be used, and I only give them as expressing my opinions when the facts will justify me. These facts I will briefly set out here. I call Secretary Stanton as a witness. He speaks of Halleck from his knowledge of him before the war. General McClellan says:-- McClellan's Own Story, p. 137. Speaking of Halleck a day or two before he arrived in Washington, Stanton came to caution me against trusting Halleck, who was, he said, probably the greatest scoundrel and most barefaced villain in America. He said that he was totally destitute of principle, and that in the Almaden quicksilver case he had convicted Halleck of perjury in open c
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 19: observations upon matters connected with the War. (search)
e train the newspapers announcing the assassination. On the night of April 16 I returned to Washington in order to be present to give aly assistance in this crisis of the country. I remained in Washington for some time in conference with Mr, Stanton, who was the moving spirit of that day, and with President Johnson. Previous to this time I had had no special relation with Johnson, but the fact that his oft-repeated declarations upon taking the presidential office, that the Rebellion must bining the prisoner, but by way of expressing their horror of the crime with which he is charged. I do not know how far I should have been stirred in the direction of putting Davis in chains had I stood beside the death-bed of Mr. Lincoln as did Stanton, who fully believed for months that Davis incited the crime, which beyond all controversy now was not the fact. While President Johnson held to the opinions originally expressed that traitors must take back seats and be punished, and while he
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 20: Congressman and Governor. (search)
endered possible by his performances in a western tour in advocacy of his own re-election. They disgusted everybody. Meanwhile Johnson undertook to quarrel with Stanton and depose him as Secretary of War. Congress resisted that, and Stanton stuck to his office. His efforts to remove Stanton caused a resolution for Johnson's impStanton stuck to his office. His efforts to remove Stanton caused a resolution for Johnson's impeachment to pass through the House of Representatives by a large majority. The ablest men of the house, barring myself, were elected on the board of managers to present and advocate articles of impeachment to the Senate. I did not quite agree to the articles presented or to the doctrines which were the guides by which they wereStanton caused a resolution for Johnson's impeachment to pass through the House of Representatives by a large majority. The ablest men of the house, barring myself, were elected on the board of managers to present and advocate articles of impeachment to the Senate. I did not quite agree to the articles presented or to the doctrines which were the guides by which they were presented. A great many men in and out of Congress, especially college professors, who always claim to know more about free trade and government than any practical man in the country, held that high crimes and misdemeanors named in the Constitution must be some crimes that were known in the catalogue of offences punishable by imp
ns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edwin M. Stanton. headquarters, Bermuda landing, May 7, adquarters Bermuda landing, May 7, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: We have made demonher despatch from him is being translated. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. [no. 37. see page 64in heavy reinforcements from Beauregard. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. [no. 38. see page rters near Bermuda landing, May 9, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Our operations mayk had come up to his [Lee's] rear guard. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. [no. 49. see page s in the field, May 28, 1864, 7.15 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. As I informed Gene by telegraph. Your obedient servant, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. [no. 89. see pagePoint, Va., Nov. 10, 1864, 10.30 P. M. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Enough now seemson, Secretary of War. [Inclosure.] Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: The triumph and el[12 more...]
m from Butler, 753; urges the return of troops sent to New York, 773; complimentary telegram to Stanton, 771; reference to, as Lincoln's successor, 773; proposes a reconnoissance of Fort Fisher, 774;28; Ord reports to, 829; Butler receives copies of documents sent to Washington, 829; letter to Stanton requesting Butler's removal, 829; telegram to Lincoln making, 829; reference to, 830; reasons fcommand, 751, 827; requests Butler to check the gold conspiracy, 763; desires Butler to succeed Stanton, 7<*>9; the powder-boat experiment suggested to, 775; approved, 807; telegram requesting Butler929-930. Stansbury, on Milligan vs. United States case, 1007. Stafford, Colonel, 496. Stanton, E. M., interview with before starting for New Orleans, 335-336; notified of need of provisions at mmands Butler's course at New Orleans, 386-387; writes Halleck regarding Vicksburg, 456; Stanton, E. M., letter from Halleck refusing Farragut aid, 457; Sumner's letters, 522; interview with, upon
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