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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 22 0 Browse Search
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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
sh; our troops going to take Petersburg next morning, which indeed didn't enter their minds. Mr. Stanton (who, I will confess, beats everybody for inaccuracy) puts our forces on the south-side railrCollis, a petty, scheming political officer; he sends letters to newspapers and despatches to Mr. Stanton about the enthusiasm for Lincoln in the army, etc., etc. Nothing is said to him; that is all the sight of them is enough! As we sat at breakfast there came a despatch saying that Hon. Secretary Stanton, with a long tail, might be looked for, per rail, very presently. It is an historical fnces, Fessenden's papa, the Secretary of the Treasury, a sharp, keen, quiet-looking man; Hon. Secretary Stanton, who looks like his photographs, only more so; Hon. Sim. Draper and Mr. Barney, twin Ne, as did his friend. We carted them all to see Fort Wadsworth, where Rosencrantz swears that Mr. Stanton, on being informed that there was only a picket line between him and the enemy, pulled out hi
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
nd there, while the Somebody puffed about, like a porpoise in shallow water! Finally, four or five people were arrested to answer charges. This seemed to please Stanton mightily, who telegraphed to put 'em in close arrest; and, next morning, lo! a lieutenant-colonel sent, with a guard of infantry, by a special boat from Washingtext morning in the guardhouse, when he was paid off. November 12, 1864 We have the usual play of rumor about cabinets — everybody seems inclined to heave out Stanton: some to heave him up to the Supreme Court--some to heave him down to unknown depths of nothingness. Many would fain fancy Ben Butler in the chair of War, where slopes there. If Meade had lacked the great moral courage to say retreat, after having been called timid by the papers, and having been hounded on by Halleck and Stanton to do something, he would not only have got a disastrous defeat, but would have destroyed the plan of re-enlistments by which we obtained the very backbone of our
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
ose of distinguished gentlemen accompanying), all except Mrs. General Grant, who was, of course, too well known to slip from memory. However, at the end of the day, I began to have a flickering and vague idea who some of them were. . . . Then Miss Stanton — of course I was brilliant about her. After I had more or less helped her over puddles and into ambulances. for an hour or two, it occurred to me that the name of the Secretary of War was also Stanton. Then, after a period of rest, my mind Stanton. Then, after a period of rest, my mind roused itself to the brilliant hypothesis that this young lady might be the daughter of the Stanton who was Secretary of War. Once on this track, it did not take me over thirty minutes to satisfy myself that I actually had been rendering civilities to the offspring of him who holds the leash of the dogs of war! She is not a roarer, like her paternal, but very subdued and modest, and reminded me of the ci-devant Newport belle, Miss L — C--. . . . Likewise, may we here mention Bradlee pere, a d
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
60. Sleeper, Jacob Henry, 49, 225, 266; resigns, 310. Sleeping-car, 229. Slocum, Henry Warner, 22. Smith, William Farrar, 136, 137, 143, 160; described, 140; lunch, 148; before Petersburg, 161, 164n; Butler and, 192. Smyth, Henry Augustus, 275. Snyder, —, 72. Soldier, qualities of a great, 163. Spaulding, Ira, 311. Spaulding, —, 26. Spies, Rebel, 244. Spotsylvania, operations near, 104. Sprague, William, 75, 115, 188. Stanhope, Arthur Philip, Lord Mahon, 241. Stanton, Edwin MeMasters, 234, 247, 248, 264, 266; daughter, 314. Starr, James, 104. Stephenson, Sussex Vane, captain, 49. Steuart, George H., 111. Stevenson, Thomas Greely, 95, 116. Stony Creek station, 285. Stragglers and pillaging, 117, 331; Barlow and, 157; Warren and, 291. Stuart, James Ewell Brown, 18; death, 125. Summerhayes, John Wyer, 268. Sumner, Charles, 78. Surgeon, English fusileer, 115. Sutherland's station, 339, 341. Swede, a visiting, 41, 63; indignation of a, 262.