Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. M. Stanton or search for E. M. Stanton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal any transports or coal vessels at Fort Monroe for the purpose of closing the channel of the Elizabeth river to prevent the Merrimac again coming out. I have the honor, &c., L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. And on page 752 I find the following: Navy Department, March 13, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Sir,—I have the honor to suggest that this Department can easily obstruct the channel to Norfolk so as to prevent the exit of the Merrimac, provided the army will carry the Sewell's Point batteries, in which duty the navy will give great assistance. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles. Be it remembered that the above extracts are all dated March 13th, four days after the so-called victory of the Monitor over the Merrimac! Would it not seem that a doubt reste
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal any transports or coal vessels at Fort Monroe for the purpose of closing the channel of the Elizabeth river to prevent the Merrimac again coming out. I have the honor, &c., L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. And on page 752 I find the following: Navy Department, March 13, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Sir,—I have the honor to suggest that this Department can easily obstruct the channel to Norfolk so as to prevent the exit of the Merrimac, provided the army will carry the Sewell's Point batteries, in which duty the navy will give great assistance. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles. Be it remembered that the above extracts are all dated March 13th, four days after the so-called victory of the Monitor over the Merrimac! Would it not seem that a doubt reste
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
purpose, the coolness and firmness in the presence of defeat, that characterized the successful General whom his countrymen have ever since delighted to honor, not more than to the boldness, the sagacity, the fertility of resource, the consummate skill which have placed the defeated commander on the roll of great captains. On May 4, 1864, Grant crossed the Rapidan at the head of about 125,000 men present for duty, according to the official reports as analyzed by General Humphreys. Secretary Stanton makes General Grant's effective force to have been over 141,000 men, but General Humphreys shows that this included the extra duty men and those under arrest. These amounted to over 16,000 men, and when deducted leave the present for duty about 125,000. General Humphreys reduces this number still farther by taking the present for duty equipped as the basis of his estimates, but as no such heading existed in the Confederate reports, the number of those present for duty is the only one