Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Edwin M. Stanton or search for Edwin M. Stanton in all documents.

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nt and starvation, the result of which will be that few, if any, of the prisoners that have been in their hands during the past winter will ever again be in a condition to render any service, or even to enjoy life. Your obedient servant, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Hon. B. F. Wade, Chairman of Joint Committee on Conduct of the War. office of Commissary General of prisoners, Washington, D. C., May 3, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report that, pursuant to your instructions of thefficer, deserves much credit for the very satisfactory condition to which he has brought his command. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. Hoffman, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary General of Prisoners. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. Testimony. Annapolis, Maryland, May 6, 1864. Howard Leedom, sworn and examined: by the Chairman: Question. To what company and regiment have you belonged? Answer. Company G, Fifty-secon
y resources of the loyal States, we may reasonably hope, with the same measure of success as heretofore, to bring this rebellion to a speedy and final termination. All of which is respectfully submitted. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Headquarters of the army, Washington, Dec. 6, 1863. sir: In compliance with your instructions, I submit the following summary of the operations of General Grant's army since my report of the fifteenth ultimo. It appelle. We have reliable information that General Sherman has successfully accomplished his object, and that Longstreet is in full retreat toward Virginia, but no details have been received in regard to Sherman's operations since he crossed the Hiawassee River. Of Burnside's defence of Knoxville, it is only known that every attack of the enemy on that place was successfully repulsed. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War.
Doc. 57.-General Graham's expedition. General Butler's despatch. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 25, 1864. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: sir: Brigadier-General Graham, by my direction, went with three armed transports and a competent force to the Peninsula, made a landing on the James River, seven miles below Fort Powhatan, known as the Brandon Farms, and captured twenty-two of the enemy, seven of the signal corps, and brought away ninety-nine negroes. They also destroyed twenty-four thousand pounds of pork, and large quantities of oats and corn, and captured a sloop and schooner, and two hundred and forty boxes of tobacco, and five Jews, preparing to run the blockade, and returned without the loss of a man. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, January 26, 1864. One of the most brilliant exploits that has been chronicled for some time past, was accomplished yesterday by some of our troops, whose brav