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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Henry B. Stanton or search for Henry B. Stanton in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
the dispersion of those whom hostility to the Liberator had momentarily banded together to break it down. On the occasion of Torrey's valedictory in the Free Amer- Lib. 11.59. ican (as the Massachusetts Abolitionist was styled, with delightful vagueness, on becoming the organ of the Lib. 11.38, 39. Massachusetts Liberty Party), Mr. Garrison inquired: Once consecrated to the anti-slavery enterprise—where are Lib. 11.59. they? Stanton has retired from the field, and is said to be H. B. Stanton. aiming for a seat in Congress. Stanton—like Birney, who had gone to rusticate at Peterboroa, N. Y. (Lib. 12.127)—had prudently declined a secretaryship under Lewis Tappan's alias (Lib. 11: 47), and had betaken himself to the law (Ms. Mar. 14, 1841, N. P. Rogers to W. L. G.; Lib. 12: 127), of which he would begin the practice in Boston the following year (Stanton's Random Recollections, 2d ed., p. 58). He was supposed to be aiming at a seat in Congress (Lib. 12: 127), and though he
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
atform, and, by general consent, land reform should be one; nor did the Western mind shrink from anticipating that woman suffrage might ultimately be another. Some wild talk concerning the power of Congress to abolish slavery in the States, and the power of the President in disregard of the Supreme Court, was heard and noted by Mr. Wright. Two days and nights were consumed by the Convention Lib. 17.185. in adjusting differences. Joshua Leavitt led the Eastern wing, with the aid of Henry B. Stanton, whose politician's progress had been shown in January at a Liberty Party Jan. 20, 1847. Convention in Faneuil Hall, Boston, where he said openly that there were in the community a set of soulless scamps Lib. 17.19. that could only be brought into our cause by the prospect of office; and if the Liberty Party could only get 40,000 votes, as a capital to trade upon, they would soon have these miserable scamps jumping upon their backs to ride Cf. ante, 2.311. into office. Quite natural
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
to its ends. Soon after, he gave the finishing stroke to the myth of sole heirship to immediate abolitionism so assiduously cherished by the Leavitt, Birney, and Stanton faction. Holding that faction's commission for the Presidency, he assured the U. S. Senate that we desire no interference with, nor disturbance of, the existing inquire whether, if they could have had the drawing up of the platform, they could have produced a better. In the conference committee over the nominations, Henry B. Stanton was authorized to say that John P. Hale would submit to the action of the Convention; and when Van Buren led largely on the first ballot, Joshua Leavitt comprty Party by moving that Van Buren's nomination be made unanimous. The Liberty Party began well and ended badly. . . . With the desertion of it by Mr. Leavitt, Mr. Stanton, Lewis Tappan, and others, I had no sympathy. Mr. Leavitt's prominent part in the nominating of Van Buren was very offensive to me (Ms. November 26, 1870, Ger
ers entered into coalition with Lib. 19.178. the Democrats for a division of offices. In 1850 came the Compromise, which still further undermined the Free Soil Party by indefinite postponement of the issue of slavery extension. As the New York Tribune said in 1851, from the point of view of Henry Clay: There being no longer any immediate danger of the extension of slavery, the feeling against it cannot but subside. Lib. 21.125; ante, p. 274. And John Van Buren, taking the stump with Henry B. Stanton and Lib. 22.101, 161. Isaiah Rynders for Frank Pierce in 1852, echoed the sentiment that the need of the Free Soil Party, from Lib. 22.157. which he had ratted, ceased with the passage of the Compromise. The superficiality charged against the party was illustrated in its attitude towards the Fugitive Slave Law. As Wendell Phillips pointed out in a speech at Worcester Lib. 21.130. on August 1, 1851, the Free Soil objections to that statute all related to its defects as law, not to