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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 39 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for S. S. Stanton or search for S. S. Stanton in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

corporate the National Military and Naval Asylum. In the Senate, on the twenty-eighth of February, 1865, Mr. Wilson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, reported a bill to incorporate a national, military, and naval asylum for the relief of the totally disabled officers and men of the volunteer forces of the United States, which was read twice. The bill provided: That General Grant, Admiral Farragut, Vice-President Hamlin, Andrew Johnson, Vice-President elect, Chief-Justice Chase, Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, and Mr. Welles, Secretary of the Navy, and ninety-three other eminent citizens of the country should be a body corporate for the purposes of the act. That the corporation should consist of one hundred members, and have power to fill all vacancies created by death, resignation, or otherwise, and to make by-laws, rules, and regulations. That the business of the corporation should be managed by a board of twelve directors, a president, two vice-presidents, and a secretary
d my assertion that General Burnside formally and earnestly requested the President to remove Mr. Stanton and General Halleck from the positions which they held in 1862-63. Now, there is no excused the enlosure is the only correspondence we ever had on the subject. Both Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Stanton assured me at the time that General Burnside had never made to them, or in their presence, th. dear Franklin: Burnside referred to the matter of his letter to the President, asking that Stanton, Halleck, and himself should vacate their places, several times in my presence; but the first tg back to the hotel, and writing this letter, which he sent. In the letter he said he was sure Stanton and Halleck had not the confidence of the country, but of that the President could judge for hi the slightest degree resembling it, ever took place between General Burnside, the President, Mr. Stanton, and myself. What General Burnside may have said to the President or Secretary of War about
isasters, made but a feeble resistance, and fled in great haste. In concluding this report, I beg to mention an act of daring and heroism on the part of Colonel S. S. Stanton, of the Twenty-eighth Tennessee Volunteers. During the engagement of the nineteenth, his regiment, exposed to a close and heavy fire, wavered for a moment Inspired by his heroic example, the regiment re-formed on the colors, and at once recovered the ground they had lost. Whilst the colors were in the hands of Colonel Stanton, they were pierced thirty times by the enemy's balls. The officers of my staff--Major James D. Porter, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General; Major John Ingram, John H. Anderson commanding; Fifty-first and Fifty-second Tennessee regiments, Lieutenant-Colonel John G. Hall commanding; Twenty-eight Tennessee regiment, Colonel S. S. Stanton commanding; Thirty-eighth Tennessee regiment and Murray's Tennessee battalion, Colonel John C. Carter commanding, with the battery of light artillery comma