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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for I. G. W. Steadman or search for I. G. W. Steadman in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
ter and servant clung together in heroic sacrifice, and no more wonderful magnetic tie ever existed than that between those Southern officers and their slaves. One of those gentlemen was my intimate friend and companion and roommate, Colonel I. G. W. Steadman, of Alabama. I do not recall his regiment. His brother, a lieutenant in the same regiment, was also a prisoner there. Colonel Steadman's negro was named George. He waited on us and was untiring in his efforts to do anything in his pColonel Steadman's negro was named George. He waited on us and was untiring in his efforts to do anything in his power for our comfort. Frequently, to my knowledge, George was sent for to go before the commanding officer outside. We often said: We have seen the last of poor George, but at night George would be escorted back by a guard. I asked George what they said to him. He told us that Mister Pearson (he was the Yankee Major in command of the prison) would tell him he was a free man; that he had but to say the word and he would be taken out and given work at $2 a day, and good clothes to wear, and g