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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 2: the hour and the man.—1862. (search)
It commenced with the message of your President of the 7th [6th] of March, 1862, when he recommended the passage by Congress of a resolution promising indemnity to the planters of the slave States if, in their State legislatures, they would take means to abolish slavery (George Thompson, speech at New York, May 10, 1864. Lib. 34: 82). Mr. Phillips, in a lecture before the Emancipation League of Boston, An organization formed in December, 1861, by Dr. Samuel G. Howe, Francis W. Bird, George L. Stearns, Frank B. Sanborn, and others, who established a weekly newspaper, the Commonwealth, which was for a time the organ of the League, and was edited by Moncure D. Conway and Frank B. Sanborn (Lib. 31: 202; 32: 146). four days later, welcomed the Mar. 10. message, with his whole heart, as one more sign of promise. Lib. 32.42. If the President has not entered Canaan, he declared, he has turned his face Zionward; and he justly interpreted the message as saying, in effect: Gentlemen of the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
t prior to adjournment, and read with thrilling effect by Charles W. Slack. As he concluded amid a wild outburst of cheering, Frederick Douglass stepped forward and led the multitude in singing, Blow ye the trumpet, blow! with the chorus, never more fitting than then, The year of jubilee has come! Mr. Garrison unhappily missed this, as he had gone to Medford with Mr. Phillips, Mr. Emerson, and other friends to witness the unveiling of a marble bust of John Brown, at the residence of George L. Stearns; but in the Liberator of the following day (which was held back from the press that it might contain the Proclamation), he uttered his Glory, Hallelujah! Lib. 33.3. and hailed the great historic event, sublime in its magnitude, momentous and beneficent in its far-reaching consequences, and eminently just and right alike to the oppressor and the oppressed. Freedom's first champion in our fettered land! Nor politician nor base citizen Could gibbet thee, nor silence, nor withstand. Th
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 5: the Jubilee.—1865. (search)
at right hand which lifted the coffin of John Brown to its place at the station, by the orders of his Government put the first torch to the hotel in which he [Tyndale] was insulted! And the conflagration was not stopped until, with poetic justice, he commanded his brigade to spare the engine-house, the Gibraltar from which the brave old man fired his first gun at Virginia slavery (Speech of Wendell Phillips, Jan. 29, 1863. Lib. 33: 27). the appointment of John Brown's trusted friend, George L. Stearns, as Assistant Adjutant-General of the United States for the enrolment of colored troops, with headquarters at Nashville— appointed to do, under the stars and stripes, in broad daylight, by wholesale, what Virginia murdered Brown for trying to do in detail. Speech of Wendell Phillips, Jan. 28, 1864. There was the case of an indignant Union General who directed a brutal slave-owner Lib. 34.22. to be tied up and flogged by the slave women whom he Brig.-Gen. Edward A. Wild. had himself