hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for S. W. Steele or search for S. W. Steele in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ignal Corps—Sergeant Tabb. Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. Report of General Marmadukempaign against the Federal forces under Major-General Steele, which was ended on the 30th ult. by thd entered Arkadelphia. On the 1st of April, Steele with his whole force moved out of Arkadelphia,ers to the main body. On the night of the 1st Steele encamped near Spoonville, having marched only 1st (I was then with Greene's column) was that Steele had certainly advanced as far as Spooneville, erries on Little Missouri river. Fearing that Steele might take this road and reach and occupy one operations of my command up to the entrance of Steele's army into Camden. For over three weeks no dme we were opposed alone to the enemy, and General Steele's army of 13,000 men consumed twelve days onel C. R. Rurteau, Memphis; Secretary, Captain S. W. Steele, Nashville; Corresponding Secretary, Maecollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer,[3 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. Report of General Marmaduke. headquarters Marmadmpaign against the Federal forces under Major-General Steele, which was ended on the 30th ult. by thime information was received of the advance of Steele's army from Little Rock southward on the militd entered Arkadelphia. On the 1st of April, Steele with his whole force moved out of Arkadelphia,1st (I was then with Greene's column) was that Steele had certainly advanced as far as Spooneville, erries on Little Missouri river. Fearing that Steele might take this road and reach and occupy one company. On the 4th, as afterward appeared, Steele commenced crossing his main army. Having concoperations of my command up to the entrance of Steele's army into Camden. For over three weeks no dme we were opposed alone to the enemy, and General Steele's army of 13,000 men consumed twelve days On the 27th, the evacuation of Camden by General Steele having been discovered, my command marched[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ost satisfactory manner, the task assigned him. The following are the officers of the Association: President, Colonel John A. Fite, Carthage; First Vice-President, Captain J. T. Martin, Nashville; Second Vice-President, Captain W. Ledgerwood, Knoxville; Third Vice-President, Captain Albert T. McNeal, Bolivar; Fourth Vice-President, Private Rhum Payne, Knoxville; Fifth Vice-President, Captain Jno. W. Morton, Nashville; Sixth Vice-President, Colonel C. R. Rurteau, Memphis; Secretary, Captain S. W. Steele, Nashville; Corresponding Secretary, Major John S. Bransford, Nashville; Treasurer, Colonel Jno. P. Maguire, Nashville. At a recent meeting of their Executive Committee to confer with our General Agent for Tennessee, and Kentucky (Colonel H. D. Capers), Captain Robt. A. Cox offered the folllowing, which was unanimously adopted: Whereas, the Tennessee Soldiers Association have become aware of the presence at Nashville of Colonel Henry D. Capers, General Agent of the Southern H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
atham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other papers and addresses will be announced. The meeting will be held during the week of the great competitive drill, and at such hours as not to conflict with that; the railroads will all give reduced rates of fare, and we urge our friends from every section to arrange to be present. our en
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nathan Hale of ArkansasDavid O. Dodd. (search)
f Camden, on the Ouachita river. The enemy, under Major-General Steele, occupied our capital on the afternoon of the same and soldiers in that garrison. Finally, he applied at General Steele's headquarters for a pass to go into the country. He s proved to contain a complete and accurate description of Steele's positions, and some of his real intentions, (which he (Steele) thought that nobody, excepting his own military family, knew,) in telegraphic characters. Of course, he was tried and condemned as a spy. In view of his extreme youth, General Steele was at first unwilling to execute him, and he paid him College, his alma mater, after again refusing to give General Steele any information as to his accomplices. General SteeleGeneral Steele approached him while the rope was around his neck, and said, David, I know that one of my own personal staff must have give, but in tones of the deepest resolution, he answered, General Steele, I don't blame you for what I am about to suffer. I t