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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Walter L. Steele or search for Walter L. Steele in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
J. Long, Alfred G. Foster; Richmond, Walter F. Leak; Rowan, Burton Craige, Hamilton C. Jones, Richard A. Caldwell; Sampson, Thomas Bunting (?); Stokes, John Hill; Wake, Kemp P. Battle; Washington, William S. Pettigrew; Wayne, George V. Strong. The Convention had 120 members. Resignations, deaths, and new elections increased this number to about 139. About one-third of these had been students in this University. The secretaryship of the convention was given to one of her sons, Colonel Walter L. Steele, the assistant secretaryship to another, Leonidas C. Edwards, and she had more than her share of the ability of the convention. After we except the names of Judge Badger, Judge Ruffin, Judge Biggs. W. W. Holden, Kenneth Rayner, Governor Reid, E. J. Warren, and a few others, it will be seen that most of the leaders were University men. When the convention came, on the 18th of June, to choose Senators and Representatives from North Carolina to the Provisional Congress of the Confe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
, following the news of Lee's surrender, which fell like a thunderbolt upon the army and the people. A large proportion of the troops of the Trans-Mississippi Department had wintered in Texas after the campaign of 1864, which began victoriously at Mansfield, La., by the utter rout of General N. P. Banks by General Dick Taylor, and ended in a disastrous check at Yellow Bayou, owing to the greater part of the infantry supporting Taylor having been withdrawn and sent to Arkansas in pursuit of Steele. The army was waiting for hostilities to reopen. Another attempted invasion by way of Louisiana, Arkansas, or the Gulf coast was expected, and but few realized that the war was nearly over. During the last year of the war communication with the CisMis-sissippi Department was almost entirely cut off, and the ports on the Gulf coast were blockaded. After the fall of Vicksburg the Mississippi river was patrolled by gunboats so closely that a skiff could hardly cross with safety. Although
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
killed in seven days fight, first death in the company; Mason, Tobe, killed at Gettysburg; Mason, Alpheus, dead; Mason, Big Daniel, dead; Mason, Hillery, dead; Morton John A.; Overstreet, W. R., killed at Hutchin's Run; Pugh, Presley A.; Pryor, Samuel, discharged; Ramsey, Samuel W., killed at Hutchin's Run; Rash, James A.; Smith. James L., wounded at Second Battle of Manassas; Smith, John M., died 1862; Smith, W. G., dead; Smith, Edward, dead; Smith, William Henry; Smith, Lea, killed at Gettysburg; Sharpe, Josiah; Steele, Pete, wounded at Fort Donelson and Gettysburg; St. John, Alexander, killed at Gettysburg; Thomas, Rice, killed at Fort Donelson, first man killed in the company; Trent, Booker, died 1862; Vaughan, Merritt, died 1862; Williams, W. W., died since the war; Williams, Charles B., died since the war; Williams, Thomas, died during the war, at Gettysburg; Williams, C. W.; Williams, A. L. P., gallant color-bearer at Gettysburg, wounded, and captured there; Wilkes, B. Calvin.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
Kentucky, by reason of his military education and experience, his wealth and high social connections. He had graduated front West Point in 1844, number eleven in a class of twenty-five cadets. Besides Generals Hancock, Pleasanton and Frost, his classmates, Buckner had, as associates in the academy, in the classes above and below him, many lads who afterwards distinguished themselves on both sides—U. S. Grant, McClellan, Kirby Smith, Jackson, Pickett, Wilcox, Franklin, Porter, Baldy Smith, Steele, Rufus Ingalls, and others of lesser note. Grant and Buckner were together three years at West Point, Grant having graduated in the class of 1843. Buckner took part in the Mexican war as Second Lieutenant in the 6th regular infantry, and by his bravery and soldierly qualities made an ineffaceable impression upon his brother officers. He was wounded at the battle of Cherubusco. In 1852 he was made a captain and commissary of subsistence, a position much sought after by line officers. B