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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for R. N. Stembel or search for R. N. Stembel in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
e, requesting the services of the gun-boats to accompany him to Belmont landing, and on the 16th of November, 1861, the General started down the river with 3.100 men in transports, convoyed by the Taylor, Com. Walke, and the Lexington, Corn. R. N. Stembel. Grant landed his troops at Hunter's Point, on the Missouri side, out of range of the Columbus batteries, and marched direct on Belmont, three miles distant, where the Confederates had posted their camp in an open space protected by fallen tattle was claimed by both sides, which is apt to be the case with raw troops; but the list of killed and wounded was in favor of the Federals, although they had less than one-half the enemy's force. The gallant conduct of Commanders Walke and Stembel does not appear to have secured even a passing notice from the Secretary of the Navy, which was certainly a great injustice to two officers who had demonstrated so plainly the efficiency of gun-boats on the Western rivers. It was a part of th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
ghlman, the commander of the fort, wished to communicate with the naval commanding officer. Lieuts. Stembel and Phelps were then sent on shore to hoist the American flag on Fort Henry, and a request the river at that point. The ironclads Carondelet, Commander Henry Walke; the Cincinnati, Commander Stembel, and the St. Louis, Lieutenant Commanding Leonard Paulding, were completed and put into coch was his flag ship at that time. During the night of the 5th, or morning of the Rear Admiral R. N. Stembel, commander of the Cincinnati. (from a portrait taken in 1883.) 6th, a heavy rain st of the vessels and officers engaged in attack on Fort Henry: Gun-boat Cincinnati. R. N. Stembel, U. S. N., Commander; William R. Hoel, First Master; Oscar H. Pratt, Second Master; Charles Armstrong, Second Assistant Engineer; William J. Shannon, Third Assistant Engineer; James McB. Stembel, Master's Mate; Philip Shell, Master's Mate; John R. Hall, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Thomas B. G
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
ides the flag-ship Benton, there were the Mound City, Commander A. H. Kilty; Louisville, Commander B. M. Dove; Carondelet, Commander H. Walke; Cincinnati, Commander R. N. Stembel; St. Louis, Lieut.-Commanding L. Paulding; Pittsburgh, Lieut.-Commanding E. Thompson; Lexington, Lieut.-Commanding J. W. Shirk, with four transports, eachy. The morning being hazy signals could not be distinctly made out, nor could the enemy's vessels approaching be seen as well as was desired. The Cincinnati, Com. Stembel, the leading vessel in the line of iron-clads, hastened to the support of the mortar-boat, followed immediately by the Mound City, Com. Kilty; and both were rekilled and one wounded. [Signed.] J. E. Montgomery, Senior Captain Commanding, River Defence Fleet. On the Federal side there were only four wounded. Commander Stembel seriously, Fourth-Master Reynolds and two seamen slightly. This was a small list of casualties for such a desperate brush. and would seem to indicate rathe