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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, V. In the dust and ashes of defeat (may 6-June 1, 1865). (search)
freedom, I suppose. The Yankees began favoring Gen. Toombs with their attentions to-day. He and Gov. Brown and Mr. Stephens have been permitted to remain so long unmolested that people were beginning to wonder what it could mean. To-day, however, news came of the arrest of Brown and Stephens, and an attempt was made to take Mr. Toombs. An extra train came in about noon, bringing a company of bluecoats under the command of a Capt. Saint-and a precious saint he proved to be. Everybody thouto bushwhacking as their only means of living. Mrs. Cumming traveled from Union Point to Barnett in the same car with Mr. Stephens. The Yankee guard suffered him to stop an hour at Crawfordville [his home], in order to collect some of his clothing.ll along the platform, honest black hands of every shape and size were thrust in at the window, with cries of Good-by, Mr. Stephens; Far'well, Marse Aleck. All the spectators were moved to tears; the vice-president himself gave way to an outburst of
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, I. April, 1861 (search)
d many a young man bred in luxury, will be killed by exposure in the night air, lying on the damp ground, before meeting the enemy. But the same thing may be said of the Northmen. And the arbitrament of war, and war's desolation, is a foregone conclusion. How much better it would have been if the North had permitted the South to depart in peace! With political separation, there might still have remained commercial union. But they would not. April 25 Ex-President Tyler and Vice-President Stephens are negotiating a treaty which is to ally Virginia to the Confederate States. April 26 To-day I recognize Northern merchants and Jews in the streets, busy in collecting the debts due them. The Convention has thrown some impediments in the way; but I hear on every hand that Southern merchants, in the absence of legal obligations, recognize the demands of honor, and are sending money North, even if it be used against us. This will not last long. April 27 We have had a te
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 3 (search)
number, and the confederacy will have to maintain 500,000 in Virginia, or lose the border States. And if the border States be subjugated, Mr. Seward probably would grant a respite to the rest for a season. But by the terms of the (Tyler and Stephens) treaty, the Confederate States will reimburse Virginia for all her expenses; and therefore! see no good reason why this State, of all others, being the most exposed, should not muster into service every well-armed company that presents itself. ironclad steam rams to sink the enemy's navy. Some say Mr. M. is an Irishman born. He was in the United States Senate, and embraced secession with the rest of the conspirators at Washington. I saw the Vice-President to-day. I first saw Mr. Stephens at Washington in 1843. I was behind him as he sat in the House of Representatives, and thought him a boy, for he was sitting beside large members. But when I got in front of him, it was apparent he was a man — every inch a man. There is
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 8 (search)
t Norfolk, and several similar floating batteries in the West. But we neglect to construct casemated batteries! Our fortifications, without them, must fall before the iron ships of the enemy. The battle of Manassas has given us a long exemption from the fatigues and horrors of war; but this calm will be succeeded by a storm. October 29 The election to take place during the ensuing month creates no excitement. There will be less than a moiety of the whole vote cast; and Davis and Stephens will be elected without opposition. No disasters have occurred yet to affect the popularity of any of the great politicians; and it seems no risks will be run. The battle of Manassas made everybody popular — and especially Gen. Beauregard. If he were a candidate, I am pretty certain he would be elected. October 30 I understand a dreadful quarrel is brewing between Mr. Benjamin and Gen. Beauregard. Gen. B. being the only individual ever hinted at as an opponent of Mr. Davis for the P
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 9 (search)
ted from Cotton Hill, and the enemy threatens our western communications. Gen. Lee has been sent to Western Virginia, but it is not an adequate field for him. He should have command of the largest army in the service, for his is one of the most capacious minds we have. November 25 Yesterday Fort Pickens opened fire on our batteries at Pensacola, but without effect. One of their ships was badly crippled. November 26 The enemy occupy Tybee Island, and threaten Savannah. Vice-President Stephens was in my office to-day, and he too deprecates the passage of so many people to the North, who, from the admission of the journals there, give them information of the condition of our defenses. He thinks our affairs are not now in a prosperous condition, and has serious apprehensions for the fate of Savannah. November 27 Saw President Tyler to-day. He augurs the worst effects from the policy of permitting almost unrestricted intercourse with the enemy's country in time of wa
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 18 (search)
the country. His guide and pilot is the identical Robt. Stewart who was sent here to the Provost Marshal-a prisoner. How did he get out? They say money did it. August 21 Some apprehensions are felt by a few for the safety of this city, as it is supposed that all the troops have been withdrawn. This is not so, however. From ten to fifteen thousand men could be concentrated here in twenty-four hours. Richmond is not in half the danger that Washington is. August 22 Saw Vice-President Stephens to day, as cordial and enthusiastic as ever. August 23 Members of Congress are coming to my office every day, getting passports for their constituents. Those I have seen (Senator Brown, of Mississippi, among the rest) express a purpose not to renew the act, to expire on the 18th September, authorizing martial law. August 24 In both Houses of Congress they are thundering away at Gen. Winder's Provost Marshal and his Plug Ugly alien policemen. Senator Brown has been very
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
in is more liberal, and he directed the Provost Marshal to save the tobacco bought on foreign account. So far, however, the grand speculation has failed. October 3 Gen. Wise was countermanded in his march against Williamsburg, by Major-Gen. Gustavus W. Smith. He had 2700 men, the enemy 1500, and he would have captured and slain them all. Gen. Wise was the trusted and revered Governor of Virginia, while Smith was the Street Commissioner in New York. A strong letter from Vice-President Stephens is published today, in which it is successfully maintained that no power exists, derived either from the Constitution or acts of Congress, for the declaration of martial law. He says all punishments inflicted by military governors on civilians are clearly illegal. There is a rumor that we have Louisville, but it does not seem to be authentic. We have nothing from Lee, and know not exactly where McClellan is. Many people thought the President himself would take the field. I
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 29 (search)
etary's attention, if the case be as stated. Again the blockade-runners are at their dirty work, and Judge Campbell is allowing them. To-day Col. J. Gorgas, who is daily in receipt of immense amounts of ordnance stores from Europe by government steamers, recommends that passports be given N. H. Rogers and L. S. White to proceed North for supplies. This is a small business. It is no time to apply for passports, and no time to grant them. We now know all about the mission of Vice-President Stephens under flag of truce. It was ill-timed for success. At Washington news had been received of the defeat of Gen. Lee--which may yet prove not to have been all a defeat. July 12 There is nothing additional this morning from Charleston, Mississippi, or Maryland. Telegraphic communication is still open to Jackson, where all was quiet again at the last accounts; but battle, then, must occur immediately. From Charleston we learn that Beauregard had repulsed every assault of the en
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXII. November, 1863 (search)
of the President's tour. Gen. Duff Green return of the President. loss of Hoke's and Haye's brigades. letter from Gen. Howell Cobb. dispatch from Gen. Lee. State of the markets. letter from A. Moseley. Mrs. Todd in Richmond. Vice President Stephens on furloughs. about Gen. Bragg and the battle of Lookout Mountain. November 1 No news from any of the armies this morning. But Gen. Whiting writes that he is deficient in ordnance to protect our steamers and to defend the port. If y Meade's army. A battle, immediately, seems inevitable. November 17 A cold, dark day. No news. It was a mistake about the enemy crossing the Rapidan-only one brigade (cavalry) came over, and it was beaten back without delay. Vice-President Stephens writes a long letter to the Secretary, opposing the routine policy of furloughs, and extension of furloughs; suggesting that in each district some-one should have authority to grant them. He says many thousands have died by being haste
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXIII. December, 1863 (search)
n, as well as in the sky above. Congress has adjourned over to Monday. December 27 From Charleston we learn that on Christmas night the enemy's shells destroyed a number of buildings. It is raining to-day: better than snow. To-day, Sunday, Mr. Hunter is locked up with Mr. Seddon, at the war office. No doubt he is endeavoring to persuade the Secretary not to relinquish office. Mr. S. is the only Secretary of War over whom Mr. Hunter could ever exercise a wholesome influence. Mr. Stephens, the Vice-President, is still absent; and Mr. H. is president of the Senate. Mr. Hunter is also a member of the Committee on Finance, and the protracted consultations may refer mainly to that subject-and a difficult one it is. Besides, if this revolution be doomed by Providence to failure, Mr. Hunter would be the most potent negotiator in the business of reconstruction. He has great interests at stake, and would save his property-and of course his life. Another letter from Gov. V
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