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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 18 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 10 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 11, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lx. (search)
tween President Lincoln and Secretary Seward, and the Rebel commissioners Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell, took place the 3d of February, 1865.entative in Congress from Illinois; and this drew out a story from Stephens. On a certain occasion, he said, when the House was in sessconference, purporting to have been written out from the lips of Mr. Stephens, so characteristic of Mr. Lincoln, that I subjoin the following fter some preliminary remarks, the subject of peace was opened. Mr. Stephens, well aware that one who asks much may get more than he who confrm of an argument. Davis had on this occasion, as on that of Mr. Stephens's visit to Washington, made it a condition that no conference shere I to give you the names of those who favor that. ...... Mr. Stephens came home with a new cause of sorrow, and those who said he talky those of his enemies who talk about taxation and the debt. Mr. Stephens has frequently expressed no apprehensions should the fortunes of
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Index. (search)
Sinclair, 16, 48. Sizer, Nelson, 134. Slave Map, 215. Smith, Franklin W., 259. Sojourner truth, 201-203. Soldiers' home 223 Spectator, (London,) 31. Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, 101. Stanton, Secretary, 33, 54, 264, 300 Stephens, Alexander, 211, 215. Stephens, Mrs. Ann S., 131. Stevens, Hon., Thaddeus, 38, 173. Stone, Dr., 81. Swayne, (Sculptor,) 59. T. Taylor, B. F., 154. Thompson, George, 75. Thompson, Rev. J. P., 143, 186, 259. Tilton, 89, 167, 196. V. Stephens, Mrs. Ann S., 131. Stevens, Hon., Thaddeus, 38, 173. Stone, Dr., 81. Swayne, (Sculptor,) 59. T. Taylor, B. F., 154. Thompson, George, 75. Thompson, Rev. J. P., 143, 186, 259. Tilton, 89, 167, 196. V. Van Alen, 173. Vinton, Rev., Francis, 117. W. Wade and Davis, 145. Wadsworth, General, 270. Washington, raid on, 301. Webster, 37, 71, 130. Welles, Secretary, 232. Wetmore, P. M., 140. Wilderness battles, 30. Wilkeson, 101. Willets, Rev., 187. Willis, N. P., 115. Y. Yates, Governor, 267. The End.
ed into the Union with or without Slavery, as the people of each State asking admission may desire; and in such State or States as may be formed out of said territory north of said Missouri Compromise line, Slavery or involuntary servitude (except for crime) shall be prohibited. The amendment of Mr. Brown was adopted by Yeas 118 to Nays 101--the Yeas consisting of 114 Democrats and 4 Southern Whigs (as yes)--Milton Brown, of Tennessee; James Dellet, of Alabama; Duncan L. Clinch and Alexander Stephens, of Georgia. The Nays were 78 Whigs and 23 Democrats (from Free States), among them, Hannibal Hamlin, John P. Hale, Preston King, George Rathbun, and Jacob Brinckerhoff — since known as Republicans. The joint resolve, as thus amended, passed the House by Yeas 120 to Nays 98--the division being substantially as before. In the Senate, this resolve was taken up for action, February 24th; and, on the 27th, Mr. Foster (Whig), of Tennessee, proposed the following: And provided furth
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 6: Louisiana. 1859-1861. (search)
ry of Learning. I had given them some of my personal care at the father's request, and, wanting to tell him of their condition and progress, I went to his usual office in the Custom-House Building, and found him in the act of starting for Montgomery, Alabama. Bragg said afterward that Beauregard had been sent for by Jefferson Davis, and that it was rumored that he had been made a brigadier-general, of which fact he seemed jealous, because in the old Army Bragg was the senior. Davis and Stephens had been inaugurated President and Vice-President of the Confederate States of America, February 18, 1860, at Montgomery, and those States only embraced the seven cotton States. I recall a conversation at the tea-table, one evening, at the St. Louis Hotel. When Bragg was speaking of Beauregard's promotion, Mrs. Bragg, turning to me, said, You know that my husband is not a favorite with the new President. My mind was resting on Mr. Lincoln as the new President, and I said I did not know t
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
supplies are coming forward finely. Governor Brown has disbanded his militia, to gather the corn and sorghum of the State. I have reason to believe that he and Stephens want to visit me, and have sent them a hearty invitation. I will exchange two thousand prisoners with Hood, but no more. Governor Brown's action at that timy if we could, without surrendering principle or a foot of ground, arouse the latent enmity of Georgia against Davis. The people do not hesitate to say that Mr. Stephens was and is a Union man at heart; and they say that Davis will not trust him or let him have a share in his Government. W. T. Sherman, Major-General. I hav Washington, D. C., September 27, 1864--9 A. M. Major-General Sherman, Atlanta: You say Jeff. Davis is on a visit to General Hood. I judge that Brown and Stephens are the objects of his visit. A. Lincoln, President of the United States. To which I replied: headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in th
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
y should go inside. The railroads of North Carolina are four feet eight and one-half inches gauge. I have sent large parties of railroad-men there to build them up, and have ordered stock to run them. We have abundance of it idle from the non-use of the Virginia roads. I have taken every precaution to have supplies ready for you wherever you may turn up. I did this before when you left Atlanta, and regret that they did not reach you promptly when you reached salt-water . . . . Alexander Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter, and Judge Campbell, are now at my headquarters, very desirous of going to Washington to see Mr. Lincoln, informally, on the subject of peace. The peace feeling within the rebel lines is gaining ground rapidly. This, however, should not relax our energies in the least, but should stimulate us to greater activity. I have received your very kind letters, in which you say you would decline, or are opposed to, promotion. No one would be more pleased at your advanceme
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
in ignorance of Mr. Stanton's telegram, sent me one himself, yesterday morning. I found on my arrival, last night, that three distinguished gentlemen, Mr. Alexander Stephens (Vice President of the Confederacy), Mr. R. M. T. Hunter (formerly United States Senator from Virginia), and Mr. Campbell, of Alabama (formerly Judge Unite, namely, the complete restoration of the Union and such a settlement of the slavery question as should be final, removing it forever as a subject of strife. Mr. Stephens suggested that, if we could stop fighting, the matter might be discussed. I told him promptly that was entirely out of the question; that we could not stop fighting unless it was for good, and that he might be assured any proposals based on a suspension of hostilities would not be received. Mr. Stephens then said they did not consider the slavery question as so formidable a difficulty, but they feared the difficulty would be to obtain such modification of the old Constitution as would
09, 310, 338, 366. Smyth, Major, II, 270. South Mountain, battle of, Sept. 14, 1862, I, 310; II, 314. Spottsylvania C. H., battle of, May 8-18, 1864, II, 194-197. Sprague, Senator, II, 197. Stahl, J., II, 8. Stanley, Lord, II, 191. Stannard, Geo. J., II, 59. Stanton, Edwin M., I, 243, 244, 265, 271, 327, 338, 344, 388; II, 150, 160, 169, 178, 183-186, 189, 196, 203, 206, 220, 226, 229, 235, 239, 247, 248, 254, 258, 263, 267, 279, 288. Stellwagon, I, 354. Stephens, Alexander, II, 258, 259. Steuart, Geo. H., II, 90-92, 101. Stevens, Geo., I, 86. Stevens, Isaac I., I, 307. Stevens, Thaddeus, II, 192. Stevensons, I, 203. Stewart, James, II, 47, 50. Stocker, Dr., I, 220, 263, 298, 299. Stone, Chas. P., I, 225, 232, 245, 253. Stone, Roy, II, 47, 49, 50, 52, 53. Stoneman, George, I, 196, 276, 324, 329, 354, 357, 363, 365, 375-377, 381, 382. Stoneman, Mrs., George, I, 363, 365. Strave, Lieut.-Col., II, 189. Stritch, George,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
., Sept. 17, 1862.Hagerstown, Md., Sept. 27, Stackpole, Albert,20th Mass. Inf.,– –Ball's Bluff, Va., Oct. 21, 1861. Standish, George W.,4th Mass. Inf.,– –New Orleans, La., June 29, 1863. Steadman, William,1st Mass. H. A.,– –May 26, 1864. Stearns, George F.,22d Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., July 6, 1864. Stedman, Charles H.,39th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864.Willett's Point, Va., July 10, 1864. Steinhoffe, August,20th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., June 6, 1864. Stephens, Alexander,2d Mass. Inf.,Winchester, Va.,Winchester, Va., June 4, 1862. Stephens, John,2d Mass. Inf.,Cedar Mountain, Va.,Annapolis, Md., Sept. 5, 1862. Stetson, Abel O.,38th Mass. Inf.,Port Hudson, La.,Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. Stetson, George F.,23d Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864.Petersburg, Va., July 8, 1864. Stetson, James W.,57th Mass. Inf.,May 12, 1864,May 31, 1864. Stevens, Charles H., 1st Lieut.,15th Mass. Inf.,Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14, 1863Manassa
., Sept. 17, 1862.Hagerstown, Md., Sept. 27, Stackpole, Albert,20th Mass. Inf.,– –Ball's Bluff, Va., Oct. 21, 1861. Standish, George W.,4th Mass. Inf.,– –New Orleans, La., June 29, 1863. Steadman, William,1st Mass. H. A.,– –May 26, 1864. Stearns, George F.,22d Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., July 6, 1864. Stedman, Charles H.,39th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 17, 1864.Willett's Point, Va., July 10, 1864. Steinhoffe, August,20th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., June 6, 1864. Stephens, Alexander,2d Mass. Inf.,Winchester, Va.,Winchester, Va., June 4, 1862. Stephens, John,2d Mass. Inf.,Cedar Mountain, Va.,Annapolis, Md., Sept. 5, 1862. Stetson, Abel O.,38th Mass. Inf.,Port Hudson, La.,Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. Stetson, George F.,23d Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864.Petersburg, Va., July 8, 1864. Stetson, James W.,57th Mass. Inf.,May 12, 1864,May 31, 1864. Stevens, Charles H., 1st Lieut.,15th Mass. Inf.,Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14, 1863Manassa
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