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Jan. 19. The State Convention of Georgia has adopted the secession ordinance by a vote of two hundred and eight against eighty-nine.--(Doc. 22.) A motion to postpone the operation of the ordinance until the 3d of March was lost by about thirty majority. Alexander H. Stephens and Herschel V. Johnson are among those who voted against the ordinance. The ordinance of secession is ordered to be engrossed on parchment, and to be signed on Monday at noon. Judge Linton Stephens says that, while he approves of the ordinance, he sees no reason for its adoption now. He therefore will not vote for or sign it. Unusual demonstrations of approbation are being made at Milledgeville to-night in honor of the adoption of the ordinance, including the firing of cannon, the letting off of sky-rockets, the burning of torches, and music and speeches.--Richmond Enquirer.
sters, and it will be construed as the convulsive struggle of a drowning man. To give it proper weight, you should reserve it until after some victory. The President assented to Mr. Seward's view, and it was withheld till the fall, when it was issued almost precisely as originally prepared. The one to which Mr. Chase supplied the concluding sentence was the final Proclamation, issued on the subsequent first of January. The Legislature of Georgia in both branches to-day adopted Linton Stephens's peace resolutions, earnestly recommending that our government, immediately after every signal success of our arms, when none can impute its action to alarm instead of a sincere desire for peace, shall make to the government of our enemy an official offer of peace, on the basis of the great principle declared by our common fathers in 1776, accompanied by the distinct expression of a willingness, on our part, to follow that principle to its true logical consequences, by agreeing that an
speech at Milledgeville, Ga., Nov. 14, Doc. 219; quotation from, Int. 46; voted against the secession of Georgia, D. 15; elected Vice-President of the Southern Confederacy, D. 17; Corner-Stone, speech of, at Savannah, Ga., March 21, D. 19; Doc. 44; personal appearance of, P. 24; offered a place in Lincoln's cabinet, P. 9; speech at Richmond, Va., April 22, D. 40; Doc. 134; speech at Atlanta, Ga, April 30, D. 51; Doc. 175; speech at Atlanta, Ga., May 23, Doc. 270; notice of, D. 76 Stephens, Linton, his action on the secession of Georgia, D. 15 Stetson, C. A., his generosity, P. 28 Stevens, John A., D. 32; Doc. 306 Stenben Volunteers, of N. Y., D. 78 Stewart, Charles, Com., letter to G. W. Childs, D. 56; Doc. 186 Stewart, A. T., P. 55; his reply to J. P. Sprague, of Memphis, Ten., P. 100 Stiles, J. W., Colonel, Ninth Regiment, N. Y. S. M. Doc. 301 Stockbridge, Mass. D. 35 Stoddard, R. H., poems by, P. 4, 29, 72, 135, 142 Stokes, Jame
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
mac or the Ohio is attributed to the same desire not to arouse the war spirit of the North. Mr. Stephens, the Vice-President, was decided in his views that the Confederacy should ally itself with theracy being willing thereto. In the Georgia legislature a series of resolutions offered by Linton Stephens defined very clearly the position of the South, and said, We hail with gratification the jupeace entered upon, that very moment we would approach nearer to an auspicious result. Vice-President Stephens zealously supported the policy that some decided and prominent action should be taken boccasion which required him to allude to the subject. It must be kept clearly in mind that Mr. Stephens and others who associated with him in urging the Confederate administration to initiate durincure peace on this continent for ages to come. In every view I can take of the subject, said Mr. Stephens, I regard the success of the State Rights party at the North of the utmost importance to us.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
n the Stephens battalion Georgia State guards, the captains were (E) H. D. Burnan, (F) Wm. H. Sworm, (G) R. Walden. Linton Stephens became captain of Company E, and J. A. Shivers of Company F. The First battalion Georgia reserves was commanded bth the addition of other companies formed the Eleventh regiment of cavalry, a sketch of which has already been given. Stephens' battalion Georgia cavalry had the following officers: Lieut.-Col. Linton Stephens, Maj. J. A. Shivers, Adjt. W. H. LawsLieut.-Col. Linton Stephens, Maj. J. A. Shivers, Adjt. W. H. Lawson; Capts. (A) J. Raley, (B) T. E. Brown, (C) S. G. White, (D) J. F. Geev. A company of Georgia cavalry, commanded by Capt. T. M. Nelson (killed), succeeded by Gill Ragland, was in the Kentucky campaign and was greatly distinguished at the battlees of Capts. (A) T. A. Sharpe, (B) J. B. Rogers, (C) J. M. Easterling, (D) William Mahan, (F) J. Jones. The officers of Stephens' cavalry battalion were: Maj. John T. Stephens, Capts. (A) B. G. Lockett, (B) J. W. Ellis, (C) J. R. Banks, (D) C. F. Re
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
e of Mr. Davis in his aptness for this kind of work had not been misplaced. After the close of the war General Browne engaged in planting near Athens, Ga., at the same time editing and publishing a periodical called The Farm and Home. He was a member of the first political State Democratic convention held after the surrender. It met in Macon on the 5th of September, 1867. He was also a member cf the Democratic convention of 1870, and was appointed on the executive committee of which Linton Stephens was chairman. General Browne was about this time elected professor of history and political economy in the university of Georgia, which chair he filled at the time of his death at Macon in 1884. He was a journalist of note and the author of an interesting biography of Alexander H. Stephens. Brigadier-General Goode Bryan Brigadier-General Goode Bryan, born in Georgia, was a cadet at the military academy at West Point from 1829 to 1834, when he graduated and entered the United Sta
"When I goes shopping," said an old lady, "I allers asks for what I wants, and if they have it, and it is suitable, and I feel inclined to buy it, and it's cheap, and can't be got at any other place for less, I most allers takes it without chappering about it all day, as most people does." Wm. P. Marrow (not Wm. C. Marrow, as reported yesterday) is the name of the gentleman so inhumanly treated by Lincoln's hirelings at Hampton a few days ago. It is a bad sign to see a man with his hat off, at midnight, explaining the theory and principles of true democracy to a lamp-post. Hon. Linton Stephens, of Georgia, has been elected Captain of a military company in Hancock county, of that State.
rn Commercial Convention, Atlanta, Nov. 13. --The Southern Convention failed to meet yesterday. No delegates made their appearance. This, however, is owing to the Convention movements throughout the South. Georgia. Macon, Nov. 15. --The Joint Committee on the state of the Republic agreed unanimously to report a bill for calling a convention of the people, with a preamble recommending resistance. It is understood that Gov. Brown, A. H. Stephens, H. V. Johnson, Linton Stephens, T. R. Cobb, and all other leading men, have endorsed the bill, and that it will pass unanimously. The legislators differ somewhat on the mode of resistance, but the immediate secession men have a large majority. A. H. Stephens spoke at Milledgeville last night. He favored the State Convention demanding of the States which have nullified the fugitive slave law to repeal their acts, and upon their refusal, which was certain, then the South could go out with clean hands. The c
Georgia Legislature. Milledgeville, Ga., March 11. --The Hon. Linton Stephens yesterday introduced a resolution in the House of Representatives, declaring that peace be officially offered to the enemy after every Confederate victory, on the principles of 1776, leaving to each doubtful State the right to decide her association by a fair Convention of the people thereof.
Stephens's resolutions. --The resolutions of Mr. Linton Stephens, passed by the Georgia Legislature, as noticed by telegraph, are those opposing the suspension of The 4th resolution contains the gist, as follows: That, in the judgment of this General Assembly, the said act is an alarming assault upon the constitutional power of the Courts, and upon the liberty of the people without any existing necessity to excuse it, and beyond the power of any possible necessity to justify it; and Mr. Linton Stephens, passed by the Georgia Legislature, as noticed by telegraph, are those opposing the suspension of The 4th resolution contains the gist, as follows: That, in the judgment of this General Assembly, the said act is an alarming assault upon the constitutional power of the Courts, and upon the liberty of the people without any existing necessity to excuse it, and beyond the power of any possible necessity to justify it; and our Senators and Representatives in Congress are earnestly urged to take the first possible opportunity to have it bletted from the record of our laws.
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