Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for A. H. Stephens or search for A. H. Stephens in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
f that splendid campaign. the Louisiana division of the Army of Northern Virginia held its annual Reunion and Banquet in New Orleans on the 22nd of January. It seems to have been, as usual, a brilliant affair, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present. the Sesqui-Centennial celebration of the settlement of Georgia was appropriately celebrated in Savannah on the 12th of February. The military display of over 5,000 soldiers, the address of Governor A. H. Stephens, the Sesqui-Centennial ode of Paul H. Hayne (recited by General Henry R. Jackson), the historical pageant, representing the landing of Oglethrope and his colonists, the pyrotechnic display at night, the trades parade on the 13th, the immense crowd of people, and other interesting features, seem to have made the celebration a grand success. We deeply regretted that we could not accept a highly appreciated invitation to be present. in the death of Rev. Dr. (General) W. N. Pendleto
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
f that splendid campaign. the Louisiana division of the Army of Northern Virginia held its annual Reunion and Banquet in New Orleans on the 22nd of January. It seems to have been, as usual, a brilliant affair, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present. the Sesqui-Centennial celebration of the settlement of Georgia was appropriately celebrated in Savannah on the 12th of February. The military display of over 5,000 soldiers, the address of Governor A. H. Stephens, the Sesqui-Centennial ode of Paul H. Hayne (recited by General Henry R. Jackson), the historical pageant, representing the landing of Oglethrope and his colonists, the pyrotechnic display at night, the trades parade on the 13th, the immense crowd of people, and other interesting features, seem to have made the celebration a grand success. We deeply regretted that we could not accept a highly appreciated invitation to be present. in the death of Rev. Dr. (General) W. N. Pendleto
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
ea which is intimated in the statements of Governor Anderson, in Colonel Bullitt's paper, in our last number. But the truth is, that while General Lee held his first allegiance as due to his native State, awaited calmly her action before deciding on his own course, and expressed his purpose, on leaving the United States army, of never drawing his sword again save in her defence, yet the whole Confederacy had the warm affections and loyal service of this devoted patriot. The late Vice-President Stephens said that when he was sent to Richmond to induce Virginia, after her secession, to cast in her fortunes with the Southern Confederacy, he found an able, zealous and very influential coadjutor in General Lee. In his address at the great Lee Memorial meeting in Richmond, in November, 1870, President Davis said, among other eloquent utterances: Here he now sleeps, in the land he loved so well, and that land is not Virginia only, for they do injustice to Lee who believe he fought onl