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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
, near Boonsboro. But Early did not cross; he had already gone to the utmost verge of prudence in the presence of a foe, whose strength was between two and three times as great as his own, and he therefore fell back next day to Bunker Hill and Stephenson's. Mr. Pond attempts a defence of these operations of Sheridan's, and would shelter him under some instructions of Grant's, which ordered him to be cautious, and not attack Early, while the latter's force amounted to 40,000 men. The facts abt would have been far more difficult for the Federals to have attacked him. On September 19, Sheridan's troops were held at bay by Ramseur's division and the cavalry under Lomax and Fitz Lee, until the mass of Early's infantry could get up from Stephenson and Bunker Hill. Then ensued one of the longest and steadiest days of fighting that occurred during the war. Sheridan was repulsed with fearful slaughter in front, and at times it seemed as if his great army was about to yield to the fierce on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
, near Boonsboro. But Early did not cross; he had already gone to the utmost verge of prudence in the presence of a foe, whose strength was between two and three times as great as his own, and he therefore fell back next day to Bunker Hill and Stephenson's. Mr. Pond attempts a defence of these operations of Sheridan's, and would shelter him under some instructions of Grant's, which ordered him to be cautious, and not attack Early, while the latter's force amounted to 40,000 men. The facts abt would have been far more difficult for the Federals to have attacked him. On September 19, Sheridan's troops were held at bay by Ramseur's division and the cavalry under Lomax and Fitz Lee, until the mass of Early's infantry could get up from Stephenson and Bunker Hill. Then ensued one of the longest and steadiest days of fighting that occurred during the war. Sheridan was repulsed with fearful slaughter in front, and at times it seemed as if his great army was about to yield to the fierce on