Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John L. Stetson or search for John L. Stetson in all documents.

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oore, Quartermaster-Sergeant; Howard B. Utter, Drum-Major; Chas. C. Fleming, Assistant-Adjutant. Company A--David A. Nevins, Captain; Peter L. Van Ness, First Lieutenant; Chas. L. Jones, Ensign. Company B--Jas. M. Pomeroy, Captain; Watson Hopkins, First Lieutenant; Geo. B. Eastman, Ensign. Company C--Frank Palmer, Captain; Royal Corbin, First Lieutenant; Pliny Moore, Ensign. Company D--Geo. Parker, Captain; Albert M. Barney, First Lieutenant; Robert P. Wilson, Ensign. Company E--John L. Stetson, Captain; Ransom M. Pierce, First Lieutenant; Charles H. Bently, Ensign. Company F--John C. Gilmore, Captain; John A. Vance, First Lieutenant; Jos. Holbrook, Ensign. Company G--N. M. Curtis, Captain; Simon C. Vedder, First Lieutenant; Wm. L. Best, Ensign. Company H--Warren Gibson, Captain; A. M. Barnard, First Lieutenant; A. S. Tucker, Ensign. Company J--Joel J. Seaver, Captain; F. F. Weed, First Lieutenant; Milton E. Roberts, Ensign. Company K-Wm. W. Wood, Captain; John McFadden,
n the hotly contested field, never doubting for a moment that it would remain in their hands. I had gone but a quarter of a mile when we met a great number of fugitives, and our carriage soon became entangled in a mass of baggage-wagons, the officer in charge of which told me it was useless to go in that direction, as our troops were retreating. Not crediting the story, which was utterly inconsistent with what I had seen but a little while before, I continued to push on. I soon met Quartermaster Stetson, of the Fire Zouaves, who told me, bursting into tears, that his regiment had been utterly cut to pieces, that the colonel and lieutenant-colonel were both killed, and that our troops had actually been repulsed. I still tried to go on, but the advancing columns rendered it impossible, and I turned about. Leaving my carriage, I went to a high point of ground, and saw, by the dense cloud of dust which rose over each of the three roads by which the three columus had advanced, that the