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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 72 6 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 54 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 51 3 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 27 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George H. Steuart or search for George H. Steuart in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
ght out their relations and kinsmen in nearly every regiment of the army. The Maryland Line was the ideal of Lieut.-Col. George H. Steuart and of Maj. Bradley T. Johnson, and for two years they labored to collect the Marylanders. All influences fr son. There were few husbands, for the enlisted Marylanders were generally youths unmarried. The field officers, Elzey, Steuart and Johnson, were the only married officers of the First Maryland regiment. Social life in Baltimore was almost oblit thus the First Maryland regiment was formed, with Capt. Arnold Elzey, late United States artillery, as colonel; Capt. George H. Steuart, late United States cavalry, as lieutenant-colonel, and Bradley T. Johnson as major. It consisted of 500 men ar In January, 1862, Elzey and the field officers of the First having been promoted at First Manassas, July 21, 1861, Colonel Steuart, while on leave at Richmond, procured an order to be issued by the adjutant-general of the Confederate States, that
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
its new field officers was on the day after the arrival at Winchester. On June 19th, Lieutenant-Colonel Steuart was directed to return to Harper's Ferry by railroad train and complete the destruction of the shops and Federal property left on the evacuation of the 15th. This duty Colonel Steuart executed with great intelligence. Instead of burning up a great magazine of seasoned and shaped gunseedingly sensible that the commanding general rewarded it with a special order of approbation. Steuart and the Marylanders enjoyed the unique distinction of being probably the only command that was ecial order. Headquarters, Winchester, June 22, 1861. The commanding general thanks Lieutenant-Colonel Steuart and the Maryland regiment for the faithful and exact manner in which they carried outzey, I congratulate you, said the man who made generals. Elzey was promoted brigadier-general, Steuart colonel, Johnson lieutenant-colonel, and E. R. Dorsey, captain Company C, major—all to date fro
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
ment was serenading them, when the fly of Colonel Steuart's tent was thrown open and all three appeore he knew Jackson had left McDowell. Colonel Steuart had been promoted brigadier-general on Mael, and Major Dorsey, lieutenant-colonel. General Steuart was ordered to organize the Maryland Linetrotted them to the rear. General Ewell, General Steuart and Colonel Johnson were riding at the hengle file in hot pursuit. Jackson, Ewell and Steuart joined the leading squadron as soon as the en to their proper places with the infantry and Steuart pushed on all night, picking up nearly every main army near Charlestown. While there General Steuart with the First Maryland and two batteriesrate cavalry when it pleased them. Ashby and Steuart were in command of the cavalry, and they deteght was commanded by Trimble and the left by Steuart, and Elzey selected the line on which the bator an infantry support. The brigade of Gen. Geo. H. Steuart was accordingly ordered forward. In a
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: Maryland artillery—Second Maryland regiment infantryFirst Maryland cavalry. (search)
ptured his own brother. The regiment, the morning after the battle of Winchester, was attached to the brigade of Gen. George H. Steuart, former colonel of the First Maryland. It was composed of Virginia and North Carolina regiments, in Maj.-Gen. Edd about nightfall to attack Culp's Hill. After a bitter struggle they took the position with a loss of three hundred in Steuart's brigade, including one hundred in the Second Maryland. In this attack Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert was severely wounded by three balls, it was believed mortally. They held their place all night, and at daylight next morning Steuart's brigade was formed at right angles to the works they had taken the night before, and charged down them at a line held by the enemy twburg the Second Maryland marched with the army to Orange Court House in Virginia, where in November it was detached from Steuart's brigade and ordered to report to Col. Bradley T. Johnson, commanding the Maryland Line at Hanover Junction. On June
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. After the First regiment was mustered out of service August, 1862, and the army of Northern Virginia returned from Sharpsburg, the hope of Maryland seemed dead. The Second regiment and the First cavalry in the valley were ordered to report to Brig.-Gen. William E. Jones, commanding the Valley district. Steuart was brigadier, Elzey was majorgen-eral, and Johnson was colonel on a military court organized under an act of the Confederate Congress to sit as permanent general court-martial for each corps in the army. The Marylanders were more dispersed than ever. When the campaign of 1863 opened, the Second Maryland led Ewell's advance on Winchester, and established its reputation for drill, for gallantry and for esprit, in the army. From Winchester Lee crossed the Potomac and moved into Pennsylvania. Johnson, chafing at being in the rear when the army was advancing, convinced, Hon. James A. Seddon, secretary of war, that it was legal to constitu
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
rst Maryland infantry. Field and staff. Colonels—Arnold Elzey, June 17, 1861; promoted brigadier-general July 21, 1861, major-general December 4, 1862. George H. Steuart, July 21, 1861; promoted brigadier-general March 18, 1862. Bradley T. Johnson, March 18, 1862; promoted brigadier-general June 28, 1864. Lieutenant-Colonels—George H. Steuart, June 17, 1861; Bradley T. Johnson, July 21, 1861; E. R. Dorsey, March 18, 1862. Majors—Bradley T. Johnson, June 17, 1861; E. R. Dorsey, July 21, 1861. Acting—Adjutants, Lieutenant Frank X. Ward, Company H; Lieutenant George W. Booth, Company D. Surgeons, E. T. Galliard, R. P. Johnson. Assistant-Surgeonsry was engaged: Winchester, Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, White Oak Swamp, Weldon Railroad, Squirrel Level Road, Hatcher's Run, Pegram's Farm, Appomattox, Petersburg. Steuart's brigade, to which the Second Maryland was assigned, assaulted Culp's Hill at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, and took the line of Federal works, occupying the same t
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ampaigns in the valley and on the Chickahominy he bore a distinguished part. Brigadier-General George H. Steuart Brigadier-General George H. Steuart was born at Baltimore, August 24, 1828, and Brigadier-General George H. Steuart was born at Baltimore, August 24, 1828, and was graduated at the United States military academy in 1848, with a lieutenancy in the Second Dragoons. He served on frontier duty in the United States army; on the march through Texas to Austin in uring its distinguished service at the first battle of Manassas, and at the promotion of Elzey, Steuart was commissioned colonel. In March, 1862, he was promoted brigadiergen-eral, and given commandthe bloody angle, and was overwhelmed on that date by the early morning attack of Hancock. General Steuart was among the prisoners taken by the Federals, and was one of those sent to Hilton Head to ckett's line at Five Forks, on the day preceding the evacuation of Richmond. Since the war General Steuart has resided upon his farm in Anne Arundel county, Maryland. He is a member of the Army and