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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stevens, Abel 1815-1897 (search)
Stevens, Abel 1815-1897 Author; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 19, 1815; received a collegiate education; studied theology and was ordained in the Methodist Episcopal Church. His publications include Memorials of the introduction of Methodism into the Eastern States; History of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States of America; The centenary of American Methodism; A Compendious history of American Methodism, etc. He died in San Jose, Cal., Sept. 11, 1897.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
teps were being actively taken to reopen the slave trade (ante, p. 411), Elihu Burritt started a preposterous movement for emancipation at less than half price, from sales of the public lands (Lib. 27: 58). According to the rule, that the more impracticable the scheme of abolition, the easier it was to secure the adhesion of the clergy at large, Mr. Burritt succeeded in putting forward the Rev. Eliphalet Nott, the Rev. Mark Hopkins, the Rev. George W. Bethune, the Rev. Leonard Bacon, the Rev. Abel Stevens, and other leading divines, together with (mirabile dictu!) Gerrit Smith, to call a convention at Cleveland on Aug. 25. See for the proceedings, which ended in the formation of a National Compensation Emancipation Society, with Elihu Burritt for its corresponding secretary, Lib. 27: 143, 148; and see for Mr. Garrison's comments on the movement and on the Convention Lib. 27: 58, 163. Burritt was thirty years behind Dr. Channing, who, interested by Lundy's personal advocacy of gradua