hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 5 1 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 19 results in 5 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
a week later before General Wright arrived with the remainder. Meanwhile, General Stevens had been sent with a small force These consisted of the Fifteenth Penns but these were soon driven, and the railway was destroyed for several miles. Stevens then retired and joined the troops destined for the direct attack on Charlesto arranged about six thousand troops for the purpose, under Generals Wright and Stevens, Brigadier-General Isaac Stevens, who was killed near Chantilly, in VirginiBrigadier-General Isaac Stevens, who was killed near Chantilly, in Virginia, a few weeks afterward. See page 461, volume II. the forces of the latter forming the assaulting column, covered by the troops of the former. These were put in motion at four o'clock on the morning of the 16th. Stevens's command was about three thousand three hundred strong, composed of the brigades of Colonels W. M. Fentone extreme advance. Companies C and E, led by Lieutenant B. R. Lyons, of General Stevens's staff, and guided by a negro. While these were pressing along the narrow
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
; disch. disa. May 28, ‘62. Stevens, Austin, priv., (F), May 14, ‘64; 33; drafted; pris. since June 22, ‘64; M. O. June 30, ‘65; abs. Stevens, Benj., priv., (C), July 26, ‘61; 18; killed in action June 30, ‘62, Glendale, Va. Stevens, Chas. M., priv., (B), Aug. 19, ‘61; 42; N. F.R. Stevens, Geo. priv., (—), Dec. 4, ‘62; 21; N. F.R. Stevens, Geo. H., priv., (H), Aug. 20, ‘61; 18; wounded June 30, ‘62; disch. disa. Co. I Feb. 24, ‘63. Stevens, James, priv., (I), June 10, ‘64; 24; sub. Isaac Stevens; died of w'nds Sept. 10, ‘64 in camp. Steward, Wm., mus., (F), Aug. 15, ‘61; 18; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; M. O. June 30, 1865; abs. sick; disch. July 19, ‘65. Stillman, Peter, priv., (A), July 26, ‘61; 25; wounded June 3, ‘64; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; disch. July 24, ‘65. Stone, Benj. A., priv., (H), Dec. 1, ‘61; 21; died June 29, ‘62, near Fair Oaks, Va. Stone, John, priv., (—), Aug. 3, ‘63; 20; sub. Edward C. Gardner; N. F. R. Stone, Samuel J.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
olitical discord in the Anti-Slavery Rooms. Many of our first men decided that the meeting should not be held, let the consequences be what they might! On the morning of the day of the meeting, I was waited upon by a committee of two —Messrs. Isaac Stevens, now dead, and Isaac Means (who married old Tobias Lord's daughter), both merchants on Central Wharf Both, also, signers of the call for the Fanueil Hall meeting. Means was in the West India trade.—who requested me to write, print, anpecially of Thompson and Garrison, and the ladies who dared to hold a meeting in defiance of public opinion. The city authorities have not yet done anything in relation to the riot. This indifference and inaction, like the part played by Messrs. Stevens and Means in instigating the mob (ante, p. 10), was the measure of the sincerity of the Faneuil Hall resolutions deprecating violence. The general opinion of the abolitionists is, that some of the gentlemen who were most active in the mob ou
ntion, 380, 383, lodges with G., 383, at meeting of Brit. and Foreign A. S. S., 383, at Crown and Anchor soiree, 384; discredits G. in England, 431; return to U. S., 431.—Letters to E. Wright, 2.314; from W. Goodell, 2.260, E. Wright, 2.316. Stearns, Charles, 2.390. Stedman, Jesse, 2.250. Stephen, George, English abolitionist, 1.351; signs protest against Colon. Soc., 361; urges Thompson to the law, 436. Sterling, John M. [b. Feb. 1800], 1.399. Stetson, George, R., 1.292. Stevens, Isaac, instigates Boston mob, 2.10, 43. Stewart, —, Elder, 1.478. Stewart, Alvan [b. South Granville, N. Y., Sept. 1, 1790; d. N. Y. City, May 1, 1849], of Utica, 2.259; drops Colon. Soc., 1.299, helps found N. Y. A. S. S., 2.170; tries to amend A. S. Constitution, 209, 259; addresses colored people, 210; at Penn. Hall, 212; resists A. S. centralization, 298; political converts, 310; at first Albany Convention, 308, 309, at second, 342; on need of Third Party, 310.—Portrait in Writings<
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
outh Carolina, except the sinking of a stone fleet of some twenty vessels across the main ship channel on December 20th, in Charleston harbor. This was done by the order of the United States government to assist the blockade of the port, and was pronounced by General Lee as an achievement unworthy of any nation. On January 1, 1862, at Port Royal ferry, was demonstrated the ease with which a large force could be placed on the mainland under the protection of the fleet batteries. Brig.-Gen. Isaac Stevens landed a brigade of 3,000 men for the purpose of capturing a supposed battery of heavy guns, which, it was believed, the Confederates had built at the head of the causeway leading to Port Royal ferry. Landing from Chisolm's island, some distance east of the small earthwork, Col. James Jones, Fourteenth volunteers, had promptly withdrawn the guns in the earthwork, except a 12-pounder, which was overturned in a ditch. Believing the movement to be an attack in force upon the railroad