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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
er South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is Union was a sine qua non with him, and hence his instructions that no conference was to be held except upon that basis. After a short pause in the conversation Mr. Stevens continued to urge the adoption of the line of policy indicated by Mr. Blair, and claimed that it would most probably result in a restoration of the Union withouion for reaching a proper solution of our own troubles without any further effusion of fraternal blood. Mr. Seward, while admitting that the views presented by Mr. Stevens had something specious about them in theory, argued at considerable length to show that practically no system of government founded upon them could be successfu<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
New York and Brooklyn; a very shrewd, bad, and dangerous man. William Campbell—his true name is Joseph A. Hoare, a gas-fixer by trade; born in the State of New York, and never south of Washington. Joseph Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably complet
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
ace, on the condition of that letter, and on no other; that the restoration of the Union was a sine qua non with him, and hence his instructions that no conference was to be held except upon that basis. After a short pause in the conversation Mr. Stevens continued to urge the adoption of the line of policy indicated by Mr. Blair, and claimed that it would most probably result in a restoration of the Union without further bloodshed. Among other things he said that the principles of the Monroe concluded by saying that this Mexican question might afford a very opportune occasion for reaching a proper solution of our own troubles without any further effusion of fraternal blood. Mr. Seward, while admitting that the views presented by Mr. Stevens had something specious about them in theory, argued at considerable length to show that practically no system of government founded upon them could be successfully worked, and that the Union could never be restored or maintained on that basis.