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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
such friends, and Mr. Henry Wilson, Governor John A. Andrew, Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, and Mr. Gerrit Smith were among them. The result was that ne of those expressed that conviction more emphatically than Mr. Thaddeus Stevens. The single subject on which light was desired by them was of Mr. Greeley, Mr. Wilson and, as I was given to understand, of Mr. Stevens, I went to Canada the first week in January, 1866, taking Bostonal proceeded in this manner, I was then creditably informed, Mr. Thaddeus Stevens had volunteered as counsel for Mr. Clay. After it had becsingle incident tending the same way. In a consultation with Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, at his residence on Capitol Hill, at Washington, in May, 18ble. I am not likely ever to forget the earnest manner in which Mr. Stevens then said to me: Those men are no friends of mine. They are pubng assassins. note.--This and the former statement concerning Mr. Stevens are confirmed to me by his literary executor and biographer, Hon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Confederate States Navy. (search)
e wharf we were progressing slowly, when Lieutenant Stevens, the executive officer, came on deck, ans surgeon, and directed him to report to Lieutenant Stevens for duty. It was early in the morning wook a few days leave of absence, leaving Lieutenant Stevens in command. Major-General John C. Breto attack the gun-boats simultaneously. Lieutenant Stevens did not like to move with the Arkansas wd and respected as General Breckinridge, Lieutenant Stevens consented to go, and at once began gettiloat and the engines reported in order. Lieutenant Stevens decided to go up about two miles and tak. The steamer was secured to the bank. Lieutenant Stevens now thought that the engines could not bare in good order, sir. The crew cheered; Lieut. Stevens gave the order to let go the lines; the enfail to penetrate the magazines or boilers, Mr. Stevens thought it useless to run the risk of havino the South, a cooler or braver man than Lieutenant Stevens never lived, though there were not wanti[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of a narrative received of Colonel John B. Baldwin, of Staunton, touching the Origin of the war. (search)
, because when he promised the evacuation, he designed and thought himself able to fulfil it; but between the making and breaking of the pledge, a total change of policy had been forced upon the administration, against Mr. Seward's advice, by Thad. Stevens and the radical governors. Seward, abolitionist, and knave as he was, still retained enough of the statesman-like traditions of the better days of the republic, to know that coercion was unlawful, and that a war between the States was, of co as we please, and aggrandize ourselves and our section! These, Mr. Seward's apologist declared to me, were the reasons which, together with their predictions and threats of popular rage, converted Lincoln from the policy of Seward to that of Stevens. Hence the former was compelled to break his promise through Judge Campbell, and to assist in the malignant stratagem by which the South Carolinians were constrained to fire on the flag. The diabolical success of the artifice is well known.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
after Wagner had been reduced; but Gillmore thought differently, and bent all his energies to make good the faith that was in him. The engineers commenced work on the night of the 25th of July, and by the 16th of August the batteries were completed. They were eight in number — the nearest one being thirty-four hundred yards from Sumter, and the farthest forty-two hundred and thirty-five yards. Seven of these batteries bore the distinctive names of Brown, Rosecrans, Meade, Hayes, Reno, Stevens, and Strong, mounting the following guns, viz.: one three-hundred-pounder, six two-hundred-pounders, nine one-hundred-pounders, two eighty-four-pounder Whitworth, two thirty and four twenty-pounders; all Parrotts except two guns, and the whole of them rifled. Never before had such a weight of metal been directed against any fortress in one attack since the art of war began. Those who have not engaged in such operations can have only a faint idea of the labor and fatigue attending the cons
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
ederal army, and the phrase, the colored troops fought bravely, had passed into a proverb. In fact, the Confederates had no sort of opinion of the bravery of the colored troops, and even at the last nothing but sheer necessity drove them to think of the race as food for powder. In the Richmond Examiner, in 1863, at the time the colored troops began to be sent to the field in the Federal forces, there was a very bumptious burlesque of the negro soldiers' bill, the favorite measure of Thad. Stevens. The editor said, in that high and mighty style which was peculiar (happily) to this sheet alone: Enlightened Europe may turn from the sickening horrors of a servile insurrection, invoked by the madmen at Washington, to a phase of this war, as it will be waged next summer, which, when depicted with historical accuracy and physiological fidelity, can scarcely fail to relieve its fears as to the future of the white race at the South, and conduce, in no small degree, to the alleviat
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 14: affair at Ox Hill or Chantilly. (search)
ed to change front when the enemy were advancing on him, and, being entirely inexperienced in the management of a brigade, he had got it into such confusion that it was compelled to retire. The 8th Louisiana Regiment, under Major Lewis, had been halted and formed into line immediately in rear of my regiments, and the remaining regiments were soon rallied and brought back by their respective commanders. After quite a severe action, in which the enemy lost two general officers, Kearney and Stevens, he was repulsed at all points, and continued his retreat during the night. After the close of the action, Jackson's division was withdrawn from the left to the rear, and Ewell's division covered the point previously covered by General Starke, and Hays' and Trimble's brigades, and the men lay on their arms during the night. While Trimble's brigade was engaged, the gallant old Captain Brown, of the 12th Georgia Regiment, in command of the brigade, was killed, and Colonel James A. Walker of
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 23: at York and Wrightsville. (search)
and with my command and the trains thus reduced, I moved across South Mountain on the morning of the 26th, and we saw no more of our trains until we crossed the Potomac three weeks later. As we were leaving, I caused the iron works of Mr. Thaddeus Stevens near Greenwood, consisting of a furnace, a forge, a rolling mill — with a saw mill and storehouse attached,--to be burnt by my pioneer party. The enemy had destroyed a number of similar works, as well as manufacturing establishments of dat they furnished us the means of carrying on the war, besides burning many private houses and destroying a vast deal of private property which could be employed in no way in supporting the war on our part; and finding in my way these works of Mr. Stevens, who — as a member of the Federal Congress-had been advocating the most vindictive measures of confiscation and devastation, I determined to destroy them. This I did on my own responsibility, as neither General Lee nor General Ewell knew I wo
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
0-42-43 Staunton, 251, 253, 285, 326, 328-29, 331, 340, 359, 368, 369-372, 375, 379, 381-82, 434-35, 457-58, 461, 462-63 St. James Church, 106 St. James College, 402 Stephenson's Depot, 250-51, 397, 399, 410-414, 419, 420-21, 424 Stevens, General (U. S. A.), 131 Stevens, Thaddeus, 255, 256 Stevensburg, 106 Stewart, General G. H., 372 Stone Bridge, 5, 16, 26-28, 31-32, 35, 50, 119, 164, 165 Stone Tavern, 26, 29 Stonewall Brigade, 163, 237, 322 Stony Creek, 450 StopStevens, Thaddeus, 255, 256 Stevensburg, 106 Stewart, General G. H., 372 Stone Bridge, 5, 16, 26-28, 31-32, 35, 50, 119, 164, 165 Stone Tavern, 26, 29 Stonewall Brigade, 163, 237, 322 Stony Creek, 450 Stop-Cock, 184 Strasburg, 165, 326, 331, 333, 366, 368-69, 397-98-99, 406-07, 437, 440-41-42, 449 Strong, Colonel, 126, 130 Stuart, General J. E. B., 13, 22-23, 25-26, 33, 36, 38, 52, 66 68, 76, 101, 105-06, 110, 114-15, 118, 132, 141, 144 148, 156, 164, 171, 176, 180, 192, 196, 213-16, 273, 285, 302-03-04 Sturgis, General (U. S. A.), 131 Sudley, 22, 29, 32, 119, 129 Summit Point, 408-09-10, 412-414 Sumner, General (U. S. A.), 132, 148- 149, 151, 158-59, 180, 182, 403 Sumt
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 3: up the St. Mary's. (search)
er of introduction from Admiral Dupont, that stately and courtly potentate, elegant as one's ideal French marquis; and under these credentials I received polite attention from the naval officers at St. Simon's,--Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Budd, of the gunboat Potomska, and Acting Master Moses, of the barque Fernandina. They made valuable suggestions in regard to the different rivers along the coast, and gave vivid descriptions of the last previous trip up the St. Mary's undertaken by Captain Stevens, U. S. N., in the gunboat Ottawa, when he had to fight his way past batteries at every bluff in descending the narrow and rapid stream. I was warned that no resistance would be offered to the ascent, but only to our return; and was further cautioned against the mistake, then common, of underrating the courage of the Rebels. It proved impossible to dislodge those fellows from the banks, my informant said; they had dug rifle-pits, and swarmed like hornets, and when fairly silenced in on
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Appendix D: the struggle for pay. (search)
he Treasury. Was the economy of saving six dollars per man worth to the Treasury the ignominy of the repudiation? Mr. Stevens, of Pennsylvania, on his triumphal return to his constituents, used to them this language: He had no doubt whatever aset been satisfactorily chastised for their cruel oppression of a harmless and long-suffering race. Inasmuch as it was Mr. Stevens himself who induced the House of Representatives, most unexpectedly to all, to defeat the Senate bill for the fulfilmeordance with the spirit, if not with the letter, of the final bill which was adopted by Congress under the lead of Mr. Thaddeus Stevens. The ground taken by Mr. Stevens apparently was that the country might honorably save a few dollars by dockingMr. Stevens apparently was that the country might honorably save a few dollars by docking the promised pay of those colored soldiers whom the war had made free. But the Government should have thought of this before it made the contract with these men and received their services. When the War Department instructed Brigadier-General Saxt
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