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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 38 14 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas H. Stevens or search for Thomas H. Stevens in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
The boat attack on Sumter. by Thomas H. Stevens, Rea]1-Admiral, U. S. N. By July 10th, 1863, a combined movement of the United States land and naval forces in the neighborhood of Charleston had given them a footing on the south end of Morris Island, and active preparations followed for the reduction of Batteries Wagner and Gregg. The results of the movement referred to, and the establishment of batteries, gave General Gillmore's command a position about half a mile from Wagner. For two months operations were conducted against the enemy, and during this period one or two unsuccessful sorties In the Military operations of General Beauregard mention is made of a reconnoissance in small force on the night of July 14th-15th.--editors. were made from Wagner. On July 18th the second of two assaults was made against that fort, which resulted in a loss to us of from six to seven hundred men out of four regiments. Ten regiments participated in the attack. The four suffering the g
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Mobile. (search)
The opposing forces at Mobile. The Union fleet in the battle of Mobile Bay. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding. Fleet-Captain, Captain Percival Drayton. Monitors. Tecumseh, Com. T. A. M. Craven, 2 15-inch guns; Manhattan, Com. J. W. A. Nicholson, 2 15-inch; Winnebago, Com. Thomas H. Stevens, 4 11-inch; Chickasaw, Lieut.-Com. George H. Perkins, 411-inch. Screw-sloops. Hartford (flag-ship), Capt. Percival Drayton, 2 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 18 9-inch, 3 howitzers; Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 2 60-pounder rifles, 20 9-inch, 1 howitzer; Richmond, Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins, 1 100-pounder rifle, 1 30-pounder rifle, 18 9-inch, 2 howitzers; Lackawanna, Capt. J. B. Marchand, 1150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren pivot, 2 11-inch, 4 9-inch, 6 howitzers; Monongahela, Com. James H. Strong, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 2 11-inch, 5 32-pounders, 3 howitzers; Ossipee, Com. William E. Le Roy, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 11-inc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Morgan. (search)
urther avail in defense. Early in the night the wood-work of the citadel was fired by the mortar shells, and burned furiously for some hours; the enemy during the conflagration pouring in his missiles with increased vigor. With great efforts the fire was arrested and prevented from extending around near the magazines, which would have been in imminent danger of explosion. In the gallant endeavor to stay this disaster I must be allowed to record the names of privates Murphy, Bembough, and Stevens, 1st Tennessee regiment, distinguished for extraordinary courage and daring. At daybreak on the 23d, accompanied by the engineer, I inspected the fort to determine its condition for further defense. The report was made by some of the company captains that of the case-mates, which had been made as safe for the men as my means allowed, some had been breached, others partly so, and that another shot on them would bring down the walls. A resumption of the fire would thus inflict heavy loss