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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
n of the harbor, to engage the enemy's flotilla (Tatnall's), and prevent them taking the rear ships of the main line when it turned to the southward, or cutting off a disabled vessel. Report of Commodore Dupont to the Secretary of the Navy, November 11th, 1861. The main squadron consisted of the Wabash, Commander C. R. P. Rogers, leading; frigate Susquehlanna, Captain J. L. Lardner; sloop Mohican, Commander L W. Gordon; sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant commanding T. H. Stevens; gunboat Pembina, Lieutenant commanding J. P. Bankhead; sailing sloop Vandalia, towed by the Isaac P. Smith, Lieutenant commanding J. W. A. Nicholson. The flanking squadron consisted of the gunboats Bienville, Commander Charles Steedman, leading; Seneca, Lieutenant commanding Daniel Ammen; Curlew, Lieutenant commanding P. G. Watmough; Penguin, Lieutenant commanding F. A. Budd; and Augusta, Commander E. G. Parrott. Fort Walker, Hilton head. That flotilla was then lying
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
he main. In the mean time Dupont sent a small flotilla, under a judicious officer, Lieutenant Thomas Holdup Stevens, consisting of the gun-boats Ottawa, Seneca, Pembina, and Huron, with the transporte miles farther down the coast, and push on to Jacksonville, and even to Pilatka, if possible. Stevens approached Jacksonville on the evening of the 11th of March, 1862. and saw large fires in thatsts, and of 400 families who were there when Dupont arrived on the coast, only 70 remained when Stevens appeared. Jacksonville was one of the most beautiful, as well as the most flourishing and imposaw-mills and a vast amount of valuable lumber were burned by guerrillas. On the appearance of Stevens's flotilla, the corporate authorities of the town, with S. L. Burritt at their head, went on bo joy by the Union people who remained there. Two days before Jacksonville was surrendered to Stevens, Fort Marion and the ancient city of St. Augustine, still farther down the coast, St. August
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
ly made arrangements to seize the United States forts, navy-yard, and other government property in Florida. In the early part of the Civil War the national military and naval forces under General Wright and Commodore Dupont made easy conquests on the coast of Florida. In February, 1862, they captured Fort Clinch, on Amelia Island, which the Confederates had seized, and drove the Confederates from Fernandina. Other posts were speedily abandoned, and a flotilla of gunboats, under Lieut. T. H. Stevens, went up the St. John's River, and captured Jacksonville, March 11. St. Augustine was taken possession of about the same time by Commander C. R. P. Rogers, and the alarmed Confederates abandoned Pensacola and the fortifications opposite Fort Pickens. Before the middle of April the whole Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to Perdido Bay, west of Fort Pickens (excepting Charleston and its vicinity), had been abandoned by the Confederates. See United States, Florida, vol. IX. Terri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stevens, Thomas Holdup 1795-1841 (search)
Stevens, Thomas Holdup 1795-1841 Naval officer; born in Charleston, S. C., Feb. 22, 1795; original name Holdup, Stevens being added by legislative enactment in 1815. He entered the United States navy in 1808, and was made lieutenant in July, 1813. In 1812 he volunteered for lake service, and in December he was severely wounded by a canistershot through his hand while storming a battery at Black Rock, near Buffalo. In the summer of 1813 he superintended the fitting and rigging of PerrStevens being added by legislative enactment in 1815. He entered the United States navy in 1808, and was made lieutenant in July, 1813. In 1812 he volunteered for lake service, and in December he was severely wounded by a canistershot through his hand while storming a battery at Black Rock, near Buffalo. In the summer of 1813 he superintended the fitting and rigging of Perry's fleet at Erie, and in the battle, Sept. 10, he commanded the sloop Trippe, behaving gallantly. He died in Washington, D. C., Jan. 22, 1841. Naval officer; born in Middletown, Conn., May 27, 1819; son of the preceding; entered the navy in 1836; was active in operations on the Southern coast, and in movements against Mobile in the Civil War. He was specially distinguished in operations against Forts Wagner and Sumter in 1863, and in the capture of the Confederate fleet and of Fort Morga